Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Autism is something that many people know about.

  • For example, some people think

  • that autistic people are fair-skinned males

  • that speak in monotone

  • and constantly go on and on about the same topic.

  • Some people think that autistic people do not know right from wrong,

  • avoid attention

  • and usually say the wrong thing at the wrong time.

  • Some people think that autistic people are socially awkward

  • and lack humor and empathy.

  • Now if you agree with what I just said,

  • I'm sorry to tell you,

  • but you do not have the right impression of autism.

  • How do I know?

  • Because I have autism.

  • I do have my own obsessions with things like electronics

  • and public transit,

  • but that does not define me.

  • Each of us are different and unique in our own way.

  • However, there is not a lot of information out there

  • on what an autistic life actually looks like,

  • so people often resort to stereotypes.

  • And we see these often in the media.

  • Some of the more common stereotypes in the media

  • include being socially awkward,

  • lacking empathy

  • and even being a supergenius.

  • And the lack of knowledge on autism doesn't stop there either.

  • Did you know that some people are trying to find a cure for autism?

  • That's because they see it as a negative thing,

  • as a disease.

  • Many people are challenging the idea

  • and to us, we think autism is not a disease.

  • It's just another way of thinking and looking at the world.

  • Our brains function differently from most people's brains.

  • Think of it like comparing and Xbox and a PlayStation.

  • They're both highly capable consoles with different programming.

  • But if you put your Xbox game in a PlayStation,

  • it won't work, because the PlayStation communicates differently.

  • When I look in the mirror,

  • I see someone who thinks differently.

  • Oh, and I also see nice hair.

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • But the question is,

  • am I really diseased if I just think differently?

  • The main problem with living autistic in today's society

  • is that the world just isn't built for us.

  • There's so many ways that we can get overwhelmed.

  • For example,

  • the thing that makes me overwhelmed all the time is loud noises,

  • which means I never crank up my music really loud

  • and I usually am not a fan of large parties.

  • But other people on the spectrum might get overwhelmed

  • with things like bright lights or strong smells

  • or gooey textures

  • that all have the potential to create anxiety.

  • Think about all of the social gatherings you've been to in the past.

  • Was there loud music playing?

  • Were there really bright lights?

  • Were there lots of different food smells going on at the same time?

  • Were there lots of conversations happening all at once?

  • Those things may not have bothered you guys,

  • but for someone with autism,

  • they can be quite overwhelming.

  • So in those situations, we do something called stimming,

  • which is like a repetitive motion or a noise

  • or some other random fidgeting that may or may not seem normal.

  • Some people will flap their arms

  • or make a noise or spin.

  • Ya, it's basically our way of zoning out.

  • It can often feel necessary for us to stim.

  • However, it's often frowned upon,

  • and we're forced to hide it.

  • When we're forced to hide our autistic traits like this,

  • it's called masking.

  • And some people mask better than others.

  • I mask so well sometimes that people don't even know I'm autistic

  • until I give them the big reveal. (Laughs)

  • But at the end of the day, it gets really stressful.

  • Even something like doing my homework at night

  • becomes very tiring.

  • Some people think,

  • because of our ability to mask,

  • that this is the cure to autism.

  • However, all it really does is makes us ashamed

  • of showing our true selves.

  • Another common stereotype that is often associated with autism

  • is that autistic people lack empathy.

  • And again, this is not true.

  • I actually have lots of empathy.

  • I'm just not really good at showing it.

  • Whenever a friend is trying to tell me

  • some of the struggles that they're going through,

  • I often don't know how to express my reply.

  • And that is why I don't show as much empathy

  • as my nonautistic friends do.

  • Emotional expression, however much or however little,

  • is difficult for me.

  • And that is because I am bursting inside

  • with every single emotion one feels at all times.

  • Though of course, I cannot express it that way.

  • Otherwise, let's say, happiness, for example,

  • would come out as a huge burst of gleeful wheezing,

  • hand flapping and loud vocal "woohoos."

  • (Laughter)

  • Whereas you may just smile.

  • (Laughter)

  • Whether it be receiving an awesome birthday gift

  • or listening to a tragic story on the news,

  • I cannot really express my reply without bursting,

  • so once again, I have to mask it in order to appear normal.

  • My inner feelings are unlimited,

  • but my mind only lets me express extremes or nothing.

  • So my ...

  • I am not great with my emotions,

  • and I communicate differently,

  • and because of that, I was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

  • This diagnosis helps me and my friends and family

  • to know how my mind works.

  • And in the world,

  • approximately one percent of the population

  • is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

  • And this number is growing.

  • However, we are still a big minority.

  • And there's still lots of people that do not see us as equals

  • to other people.

  • This is my family.

  • And in my family,

  • there is one other person who is also autistic.

  • My mother.

  • Yes, adult women can also be autistic.

  • My dad and my brother are both nonautistic.

  • Sometimes it can be a bit difficult for us to communicate with each other,

  • however.

  • Sometimes I'll say something like,

  • "Oh, Toronto's Union Station, right?"

  • thinking that I can

  • help them to remember certain aspects of it.

  • When they get confused, I often have to elaborate myself on that.

  • And we often have to say things

  • in a number of different ways so that everyone understands.

  • However, despite all that,

  • we all love each other and respect each other as equals.

  • In his book "NeuroTribes,"

  • author Steve Silberman states that autism and other mental conditions

  • should be seen as naturally human,

  • naturally part of a human spectrum

  • and not as defects.

  • And this is something that I agree to completely.

  • If autism was seen as part of a natural human spectrum,

  • then the world could be designed to work better for autistic people.

  • I am not ashamed of my autism.

  • And I may not think like you,

  • or act like you,

  • but I am still human and I am not diseased.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

Autism is something that many people know about.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

患有自閉症是什麼樣子的? (What it's really like to have autism | Ethan Lisi)

  • 2 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字