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  • I guess it's Akita dialect!

  • Ok, please start!

  • It says "nazuki" here

  • It's a body part

  • A body part...

  • A part of your face

  • Hmmm... eyes!

  • Nope, it's not eyes

  • A little bit higher than the eyes

  • Eyebrows?

  • Not eyebrows. It's a wide area!

  • You're right!

  • I don't even know how to say it in standard Japanese

  • I never use that word

  • I know the kanji but I have no idea how to say it

  • Forehead (odeko)

  • Wait, say that again

  • It's written like "nazuki" but you say it like...

  • Wait that's completely different!

  • I can't understand it at all

  • The next one is also a part of the face

  • A lower part of the face

  • Chin!

  • Is that correct?

  • Yeah! You got it on the first try!

  • How did you know?

  • I have no clue, I've never used it before

  • Ok this is a part lower on the body

  • It's lower than your belly button, lower than your thighs

  • Lower than my thighs?

  • Hmm, is it knees?

  • Oh is it knees?

  • Yes!

  • Yes we call them "hijyakabu"

  • That's really long!

  • Wonder why they changed it from hiza to hijyakabu

  • So the word "hiza" isn't used at all?

  • The young people say "hiza" now but

  • Older people will say things like "my hijyakabu are hurting..." etc

  • Oh wow so they will always use "hijyakabu"

  • That's so interesting

  • I wonder if they use these words in the Iwate area as well...

  • I've never heard them before

  • Well if that one was knees, then this one is elbows?

  • Oh~! Yeah the original Japanese word is part of this one

  • Oh was I correct? Elbows?

  • I feel like just "hiji" is fine we don't really need the "chiri"...

  • But we use "hijichiri" here

  • It sounds cuter when you put "chiri" on the end

  • It's kind of hard to say!

  • Ok this time is a body part even lower, lower than your knees

  • It doesn't sound like Japanese!

  • Yeah you're right

  • Ok so it's below the knees...

  • Foot? (ashi also means leg)

  • Yes yes, the front or the back of the foot?

  • The heel?

  • You're right!

  • Oh really?

  • Hmm yeah I can see that

  • It kinda sounds like "kakato" so it fits

  • I think just "kakato" is fine, I wonder who decided to call it "agudo"

  • Everyone will understand if you use "agudo" here

  • If you say it with a real Akita accent what does it sound like?

  • Ah ok, this one sounds the same

  • This is so interesting

  • Right?

  • I understand even less than I was expecting

  • Let's try some other phrases not related to the body

  • This one you use in the afternoon, or the evening when you welcome a guest

  • You say "ke!" to your guest?

  • If it's your family or someone close

  • Ok, so when they come to your house...

  • Something like "hello"? Is it a greeting?

  • Hmm no it's not a greeting

  • When you suggest something

  • Sort of like "Would you like this one?"

  • Not even close?

  • Umm... when you eat something

  • Ohhh like "kue" (eat this)

  • You wouldn't say it like this to a guest, but to your family or a close friend it's ok!

  • When we're busy, we will say "cha cha to ke!"

  • It means "Hurry up and eat"

  • This is...

  • Warm?

  • Yep that's right, you got it just from seeing it

  • Put some emphasis on the "gu"

  • The "nu" is normal

  • When it's really hot we'll say...

  • This one is even kinda difficult to read. What do you think it says?

  • Yeah yeah, just like that!

  • Oh really? I just randomly said it

  • Yeah the intonation is just like that!

  • We use it with small children

  • What kind of situation do you think we use that in?

  • Try saying it one more time

  • Used with kids eh...

  • Is it like "Clean up"?

  • Am I close?

  • Try reading this a little quicker

  • Do you think we would use that towards quiet, well-behaved children, or...?

  • Ohh ok so kind of like "calm down, be quiet"

  • Yeah that's it!

  • Where did this phrase come from!?

  • I have no clue

  • Kids that don't behave properly

  • You can use it with adults too, ones who aren't well behaved

  • So I guess you could translate it as "behave properly"

  • Do you use "kochowashii" in standard Japanese?

  • I've never heard it!

  • It must be a word only used around here then

  • So interesting!

  • So like, "Hurry up and come here"?

  • Yep!

  • Did you figure it out from the nuance?

  • I feel like "guugudo" sounds like it would mean "slowly" instead of "quickly"

  • So "guugudo" alone means "quickly"?

  • Yep!

  • You can also say "chaccha to koi!"

  • We use those phrases when we're really in a hurry

  • When you're running out of time and you say "hayaku ikou yo~"

  • It doesn't really work, right?

  • It tends to work for me... haha

  • But if I use that phrases it will DEFINITELY work

  • It means like "We won't make it if you don't hurry up!!"

  • Oh ok so a level up from your standard "hurry up"

  • Yes yes, level up

  • I'm gonna try it out in Tokyo

  • Please say it how you're normally say it

  • Oh? It changed!

  • "koi" is already kind of an order, telling someone to hurry up and come here

  • So when you're with a group of people it kind of feels like you're ordering them around

  • But it's not rude, just...

  • We have these phrases, but we don't use them too much

  • Even in the countryside we use standard Japanese with our children

  • So even adults will use standard Japanese when talking to each other, for the children

  • So nowadays we don't use these phrases too much

  • But with your obaachan friends you'll use them right?

  • Yes we do

  • The Senboku City dialect is pretty intense

  • The daily conversations we have turn out to be 100% Senboku City dialect

  • All of it

  • What should I say?

  • ((( Sorry guys I can't translate this part properly so just enjoy listening, haha )))

  • Something like that!

I guess it's Akita dialect!

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A2 初級

與寄宿家庭一起說日語。 (SPEAKING JAPANESE WITH MY HOMESTAY FAMILY)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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