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  • - Eat Sleep Dreamers welcome back to another lesson with me, Tom, and Grace.

  • - Hi!

  • - Welcome back. I can't wait, we're gonna dive into five differences between British

  • and American English pronunciation.

  • Alright so, we are here to look at the difference

  • between British and American English pronunciation. I am from London, so I am going to be giving

  • the British English examples. Grace, you are from Hong Kong?

  • - I am from Hong Kong. I'm not American, but I have a North American accent.

  • - That's right.

  • - That's right. So it's kind of a combination between an American, a pan-American accent

  • and a sort of Canadian-ish accent?

  • - Alright let's get straight into number one, yod dropping.

  • - Okay.

  • - Yod dropping, what an amazing phrase.

  • - Sounds like a dance move that people are doing now.

  • - Ahhh, we're all doing the yod drop.

  • - Yeah we're all doing.

  • - Are you doin' the yod drop? So yod dropping, also sounds like an animal leaving it's excrement

  • everywhere.

  • - Yes exactly.

  • - Yod dropping--

  • - Look that dog just yod dropped.

  • - He just yod dropped.

  • - Okay.

  • - So yod dropping is when you take out the yuh sound. Okay, so can you say this word

  • for me?

  • - Tuna.

  • - Huh, and I would say tuna.

  • - Tuna.

  • - Tuna. So as you can see that the yuh sound is in the British accent, right, so tuna,

  • but you would say?

  • - Tuna.

  • - Tuna, right, so it's gone. Another example--

  • - Well it wasn't, it's not supposed to be there in the first place I think.

  • - Yeah okay fair play. Yeah, alright. Maybe we add it, maybe that's the thing here.

  • - Yeah, yeah you add it.

  • - Next word, opportunity.

  • - Opportunity.

  • - Opportunity.

  • - Opportunity.

  • - Okay, this social media platform. YouTube.

  • - YouTube.

  • - Ah hah, tube.

  • - YouTube.

  • - Tube. Interesting.

  • - Tube.

  • - So this happens when we have a consonant like t or d, and then the u after it.

  • - Okay.

  • - Alright, so if you look at all of those examples: tuna, tu, opportunity tu, YouTube

  • tu. Du, um, due.

  • - K. Due.

  • - Due.

  • - It's due tomorrow, yeah.

  • - It's due tomorrow, your essay is due tomorrow, okay.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Due.

  • - Due.

  • - Due. Due tomorrow.

  • - Due.

  • - Producer.

  • - Producer.

  • - Producer. Duty.

  • - Duty.

  • - She said duty.

  • - Yeah, you said duty.

  • - We're gonna give you guys an example of a sentence to show you how it's different.

  • - Okay. There is a great opportunity at YouTube to be a producer.

  • - Okay. There is a great opportunity at YouTube to be a producer. Okay, number two. This one

  • is a funny little one, it's just a tiny change but it's quite significant. So, the a to eh.

  • - Okay.

  • - It's when you've got, like an A-R-R-Y.

  • - Okay.

  • - So, Prince Harry, is?

  • - Prince Harry.

  • - What?

  • - Prince Harry.

  • - Like hairy.

  • - That's--

  • - It sounds like hairy, to me.

  • - Alright, alright.

  • - Prince.

  • - Prince Harry, yeah.

  • - Prince Harry.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Harry.

  • - Harry.

  • - So hah.

  • - Harry.

  • - Harry.

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Right, okay so yeah I was gonna do another one, yeah. Harry Potter.

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Oh god.

  • - We're gonna get onto ts in a minute, oh no.

  • - Harry Potter. Harry Potter; okay you do it.

  • - Harry Potter. Harry Potter, Harry, right? Okay, marry.

  • - Marry.

  • - That's Merry, like-

  • - Marry.

  • - Merry as in like Merry Christmas.

  • - No, marry, they married yesterday at the church. Married.

  • - Whoa.

  • - Marry.

  • - Marry, yeah.

  • - No.

  • - Okay, carry.

  • - Carry.

  • - Carry?

  • - Yeah.

  • - There's an--

  • - Yeah.

  • - There's a name Carrie, like.

  • - Like Carrie, yeah.

  • - But, carry, that's cr. I don't understand.

  • - What don't you understand? It's how I speak, it's how we speak.

  • - It's how we speak.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Alright, fair enough. Also, embarrassed.

  • - Embarrassed.

  • - Embarrassed.

  • - Embarrassed. Yeah.

  • - So strange.

  • - So very slight, you do the a, and--

  • - Yeah, yeah.

  • - Yeah. I guess I sort of flatten it into an eh.

  • - Eh, okay let's say the sentence. When Prince Harry got married he carried Meghan Markle

  • all the way home.

  • - When Prince Harry got married he carried Meghan Markle all the way home.

  • - Thank you.

  • - You're welcome.

  • - Okay, this one we've talked about a lot before, is the r sound.

  • - Yeah. It's so much more pronounced in American English, right?

  • - Yeah. Because there's an r in there that should be pronounced.

  • - Well. We don't always pronounce all the letters.

  • - Yeah, no.

  • - So car in British English.

  • - Car.

  • - Car.

  • - Car.

  • - Car.

  • - Park.

  • - Park.

  • - Park.

  • - Park.

  • - Horse.

  • - Horse.

  • - Again?

  • - Horse.

  • - Horse.

  • - Horse.

  • - Okay, let's do this sentence. Why did you park your car so far away?

  • - Why did you park your car so far away?

  • - Again, do that again.

  • - Why did you park your car so far away?

  • - Why did you park your car so far away? That's terrible.

  • - Why did you park your car so far away?

  • - Alright so, yeah, the r clearly--

  • - Yes.

  • - Much more pronounced in American English. Okay number four is the sound, what for British

  • English is the o, and in American English is oh.

  • - Oh. Now the key here, let's take the word go for example. Go, I'm making that sound

  • kind of at the front of my mouth.

  • - Okay.

  • - Whereas in American English.

  • - Go.

  • - You are creating it where?

  • - Here, I guess, the back of my--

  • - Yes, further back, right? So, and that speaks to the mouth position as well. So, go.

  • - Go. Yeah I suppose when I try to say, do that, however badly I try to do it.

  • - Yeah. The sound is coming from the front of my tongue, because so it's kinda like go.

  • 'Cause I'm, as the sound comes out it gets filtered.

  • - Go, get set, go.

  • - But, whereas when I say go, the o is created here.

  • - At the back, right. So, take the word throw.

  • - Throw.

  • - Uh huh, know.

  • - Know.

  • - Rio.

  • - Rio.

  • - Uh huh.

  • - It's a very subtle difference.

  • - Really subtle difference. And maybe one that a lot of learner's of English might not

  • hear first time. Let's put it into a sentence. See if they can hear this.

  • - Let's go to Rio with Cleo.

  • - Let's go to Rio with Cleo.

  • - Let's go to Rio with Cleo.

  • - Let's go to Rio with Cleo.

  • - The last one, and my favorite, is the tuh sound. We talked about this before,

  • - Yeah. we always have a laugh about this.

  • - Yes. Can you say the wizard, the name of the wizard, created by J.K Rowling?

  • - Toto. No that's the dog. The wizard. That's the dog from Wizard of Oz.

  • - Oh my goodness.

  • - Sorry, say what, what am I trying to--

  • - The character created by J.K Rowling.

  • - Oh, right, okay, the other one, Harry Potter.

  • - Say it again?

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Potter.

  • - Potter, how do you say it?

  • - Potter.

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Yeah, okay. So I've spoken about this quite a lot before, we have, there's two ways for

  • us to say it. We say it with a true t, so Potter. Or, with the glottal t, Potter. And

  • that's when we hold back the sound. It's like a Pott-er. So either we say it with a true

  • t, tuh, like Harry Potter, or with the glottal t, Harry Potter.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Can you do that for me?

  • - Which one?

  • - The glottal t.

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - What?

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Harry Potter.

  • - Harry Potter needs to go to Hogwarts.

  • - Yeah, he's gonna have some water.

  • - Water, he's gonna have some water.

  • - Right, but in American English, we've got uh?

  • - Yeah, we kind of soften the t into a d.

  • - Let's put those words side by side and you can hear the difference in sounds. So water.

  • - Water.

  • - And with glottal t, water.

  • - Water.

  • - Daughter.

  • - Daughter.

  • - Hotter.

  • - Hotter.

  • - Just really quickly with the glottal t, it's important to know that we use the glottal

  • t when the t is in the middle position of a word or at the end of a word. But never

  • at the beginning. So 'cause I've gotten a word like time, I would never go like ime,

  • that would be ridiculous. Okay let's put it into a sentence so we can compare the sounds.

  • - Okay. Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - Okay let's do it again. Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - I'm gonna do it with the glottal t. Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - Harry Potter drank some hot water. Okay, sorry, lemme do it properly.

  • - So bad.

  • - Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - No, with the glottal t, try the glottal t again.

  • - Harry Potter drank some hot water.

  • - So bad.

  • - That's exactly how you sound like.

  • - Yeah.

  • - That's how you sound like.

  • - Okay so those are five differences between British and American English, the pronunciation.

  • There are loads more. Yeah?

  • - Yep.

  • - Maybe we'll do another video if you like this one, looking at five more differences

  • in sounds. Grace, thank you again for joining me.

  • - Thank you.

  • - An absolute pleasure. And we'll see you guys again, real soon. This Tom and Grace,

  • say goodbye.