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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hello everyone, and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • Today I'm very hot, and it's only 19 degrees.

  • We're gonna talk about that later.

  • Today I'm going to talk to you about

  • 50 weird and random facts about British culture.

  • Now this lesson's more of a fun one.

  • It's going to be great for your listening practise

  • and if you want to improve your pronunciation

  • alongside your listening, I highly recommend Audible.

  • It's an online database of audiobooks,

  • and I've got loads of recommendations

  • in the description box.

  • Basically, if you listen to an audiobook

  • narrated by a native speaker,

  • at the same time as reading the actual book,

  • it's basically the key to learning perfect pronunciation.

  • You can claim your free audiobook and 30 day free trial

  • by clicking on the link in the description box,

  • where I've also put loads of recommendations

  • for great audiobooks, to help you improve your English.

  • Right, let's get started with the video.

  • Fact number one.

  • Tea is by far the most popular drink drunk by Brits.

  • Maybe you knew this, but apparently we drink

  • 165 million cups of tea every single day.

  • Bananas!

  • I've drunk no tea today.

  • It's not my favourite, I don't hate it,

  • I'll have it if I'm offered, but yeah.

  • Number two, on our main TV channels,

  • that's channel one and two and quite a few others,

  • they're run by the BBC and we don't have any adverts.

  • This is because we pay a licence fee

  • and I think it's over 100 pounds a year,

  • but basically we have to pay.

  • If we have a TV we have to pay it,

  • even if we don't wanna watch the BBC.

  • Now I kind of like it because I like ad-free TV,

  • but I also don't want the BBC

  • to tell me whether I can have a TV or not.

  • Number three, queues are incredibly important to us.

  • If you push into a queue, if you queue-jump,

  • you will be universally hated in Britain.

  • Doesn't make sense.

  • Comment below if queues are important in your country,

  • because I went to Spain and I lived there for a while,

  • and people did not respect queues.

  • When I lived in Spain I remember being in a bank

  • and some lady thought that her problem

  • was more important than my problem,

  • and she just pushed in and was like

  • sorry, this is an emergency.

  • I was like, in Britain that would never happen!

  • Number four.

  • Please, sorry and thank you basically dominate

  • all of our social interactions.

  • It's so ingrained into our brains

  • that we often bump into things

  • and then apologise to the inanimate object.

  • Like I have whacked my shoulder on a door

  • and said "Oh, sorry", and then felt really stupid

  • and British, at the same time.

  • But yeah, just a simple task

  • like passing the salt at a dinner table.

  • "Sorry, please could you pass the salt?

  • "Thank you, sorry, sorry, excuse me please."

  • Honestly, we say it about eight times.

  • Number five.

  • When you greet a friend in the U.K.

  • you don't normally shake their hand.

  • You don't normally shake their hand.

  • Normally you give them one kiss on the cheek.

  • If you've recently been in the rest of Europe

  • then you might give two kisses by mistake

  • and say "Oh sorry, I've just got back from France.

  • "Just got back from Spain."

  • And if you're feeling very masculine

  • and you're with another very masculine person,

  • then even though you know them very well

  • you might still shake their hand,

  • but that's only if you're very very masculine.

  • Number six.

  • When the sun comes out,

  • because it doesn't come out so often,

  • we make the most of it.

  • In 15 degree heat we will wear sandals, mini-skirts,

  • strappy tops, bikinis,

  • and we will get very very sunburned as well.

  • The day after a sunny day, everyone is red.

  • It's terrible.

  • Also, our houses are not designed to cope with the heat,

  • as I'm experiencing right now.

  • It's 19 degrees outside and I am absolutely dying.

  • Number seven.

  • British cuisine, well our most known dish

  • is probably the Sunday roast,

  • or beef and Yorkshire puddings.

  • However, we actually voted for our national dish

  • and we voted for a chicken tikka masala,

  • which is an Indian dish.

  • Number eight, if you are on public transport

  • it is highly expected that you give up your seat

  • for an elderly person or a disabled person.

  • And if you don't do it, people will tut at you.

  • This is a very British thing.

  • People just go (repeated tutting).

  • But we don't like to be too direct.

  • Sometimes we muster up enough courage to say

  • "Excuse me, that person needs that seat",

  • but we're not gonna be too confrontational about it.

  • And if we are ever confrontational with someone

  • on public transport, we spend the next week

  • coming down from the adrenalin and replaying the situation

  • in our head, telling our mates about it.

  • It's a big deal.

  • Number nine, our humour can be quite difficult to understand.

  • We love sarcasm, we have quite dark sense of humour.

  • We can be quite dry, so we can say things without smiling.

  • I love the British sense of humour

  • but it can offend people sometimes.

  • Sucks to be them.

  • Number 10.

  • The majority of museums in London are free.

  • And we do actually use them quite a lot.

  • There's been a big increase

  • in Brits trying to do cultural things,

  • which I think is great.

  • Hasn't quite reached me yet,

  • but I did go to the museum in my village last year,

  • so that was great.

  • Number 11.

  • If you are invited to the home of a British person,

  • if they are providing a meal or a party for you

  • then you are sort of expected to bring some sort of gift.

  • Normally a bottle of wine, some flowers or chocolates.

  • If you don't bring a gift,

  • we wouldn't say anything about it

  • but we would silently judge you.

  • Number 12.

  • We are absolutely obsessed with our animals here,

  • by animals I mean pets.

  • We put our pets before our own children sometimes.

  • We are dog and cat crazy.

  • Number 13, as soon as the sun comes out

  • we leave work, when it's a good time to leave work,

  • normally five o'clock, and we go straight to a pub garden.

  • We don't go inside the pub,

  • we go straight to the pub garden

  • or if there's no direct route to the garden

  • then we will march through the pub directly to the garden.

  • We love a pub garden.

  • In fact when I finish this video,

  • I'm going straight there with my neighbour.

  • 14, that brings me onto our drinking culture.

  • It's quite bad but it's getting better.

  • It's very normal to see some very very drunk people

  • on Friday and Saturday nights,

  • and Sunday nights if it's a bank holiday,

  • which means we have the Monday off work.

  • But millennials, our younger generation, are drinking less,

  • which is a very good thing,

  • and binge-drinking cases are going down.

  • Number 15.

  • If we hold open a door for you, which we probably will,

  • we expect a thank you.

  • However, if somebody holds a door open for us,

  • and it's actually at a really awkward distance

  • so we have to kind of walk faster

  • and they have to wait for ages holding the door,

  • both parties hate this situation

  • but we still say thank you and we still do it,

  • because, I don't know why.

  • It's polite!

  • Number 16.

  • We are, hmm, this is divided.

  • Some of us are very polite drivers

  • and some of us are very rude.

  • The polite drivers will probably let you through

  • but they will expect a thank you.

  • We live for that thank you wave.

  • Sometimes people just lift a finger and that's enough.

  • I just like the acknowledgement.

  • I'm a polite driver.

  • Polite drivers also love to tut and shake their head

  • at impolite drivers who have not thanked you

  • for letting them pass.

  • (repeated tutting)

  • Number 17.

  • In many cultures around the globe

  • women want to have lighter skin,

  • but in the U.K. we want to have darker skin.

  • Well, not all of us, but a lot of us like to use

  • fake tanning products to make our skin darker.

  • I must admit I have got some on today.

  • I'm a very light shade of orange, on my knees particularly.

  • Yeah, we don't have much sun,

  • we don't get much chance to tan,

  • and having a tanned complexion, I think,

  • is almost a sign of wealth.

  • Like you've been on holiday recently.

  • I just think I look healthier with a bit of a tan

  • but you might not agree.

  • Number 18, we are very divided over the Royal Family.

  • Some people think it brings in loads of tourism and money.

  • Some people think that they spend way too much money

  • and there's never really been a study to show

  • whether they bring a profit or loss to the country.

  • So it's a funny one, we just don't know.

  • Number 19, the weather in summer can never be guaranteed.

  • So we don't actually go on holiday

  • in our own country that much.

  • We do, but we can't guarantee

  • it's gonna be a sunny beach holiday.

  • A couple of years ago my family and I

  • went away to Cornwall, to a beach resort,

  • and there was not a single day of sunshine.

  • It poured it down the entire time

  • and we just said never again.

  • We will always go abroad now.

  • Number 21.

  • We like to thank the bus driver when we get off the bus.

  • In London, on the school bus, anywhere,

  • it's pretty normal to say "Thank you", as we get off.

  • My school bus driver was absolutely amazing.

  • He actually used to buy us all Easter eggs.

  • A whole school bus of children, he was lovely,

  • his name was Roger.

  • I hope I get to see him again.

  • Number 22.

  • Dinner is often our biggest meal of the day,

  • I'm talking about evening dinner.

  • We have a fairly heavy breakfast, a light lunch

  • and then a heavy dinner,

  • and we normally have breakfast between seven and eight,

  • lunch between 12 and one,

  • and dinner between six and seven normally.

  • Number 23.

  • "How are you" and "You all right" are not genuine questions.

  • If we say "Hi, you all right,"

  • I don't actually expect you to answer saying

  • "Well, actually, no I'm not, my goldfish died."

  • I just expect you to say "Yeah yeah, you all right."

  • And that's it.

  • Top quality interaction.

  • Number 24.