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  • If you're a pre-med or medical student, you've likely heard of Anki.

  • Chances are that you fall into one of two camps - you either love it, or you've tried

  • it and decided that it wasn't for you.

  • If you fall into the latter, I'm willing to bet that you're not creating good flashcards.

  • These are the best principles to make Anki easy and effective.

  • Dr. Jubbal, MedSchoolInsiders.com.

  • If you haven't already, be sure to watch the part one video on how to improve your

  • memory.

  • This is the part two video in a three part series.

  • Spaced repetition software, like Anki, is one of the most powerful learning tools available

  • for medical students.

  • But as a tool, there are those who use it well, and those who misuse it.

  • When I first started using Anki as a medical student, some of my cards were good, but most

  • were garbage.

  • It wasn't until the end of medical school and while I was in plastic surgery residency

  • that I began using it most effectively.

  • These are the best practices in creating effective flashcards.

  • First, keep your decks simple. Don't have a sub-deck for each week in a

  • class.

  • This fragmentation simply complicates the task of reviewing the necessary information.

  • My general recommendation is to create a single deck for large exam.

  • In medical school, I had a single deck for Step 1 that included everything from my first

  • two years.

  • My Step 2CK deck included everything from my third year.

  • Within each deck, I tagged cards by organ system, like cardiology or pulmonology, and

  • also by other useful pieces of information, such as whether they included a mnemonic or

  • other memory device.

  • Structuring your deck in this manner serves two main purposes.

  • First, you'll waste less time organizing and structuring your deck.

  • Sometimes simple is better.

  • Second, and more importantly, you'll be in the habit of reviewing the entire deck,

  • which is very good for your larger exams, whether that's the MCAT or USMLE Step 1

  • or COMLEX.

  • With a fragmented deck, this just doesn't happen.

  • Remember, for spaced repetition software like Anki to work properly, you must regularly

  • review information.

  • Many students are concerned that they'll be wasting precious time reviewing older information

  • at the expense of newer information.

  • But therein lies the beauty of spaced repetition.

  • By the time you've moved onto the next class, the intervals for your previous subject are

  • much longer, meaning it takes far less time to maintain the already-consolidated information.

  • And when the big exam comes around, you still remember most everything.

  • Number two, First Understand, Then Memorize. A surprising number of students succumb to

  • the mistake of trying to memorize something that they don't comprehend.

  • There is little utility in memorizing a string of information if you are not able to adequately

  • conceptualize and place it within a mental scaffolding.

  • If you don't first understand the information, you're much less likely to remember and

  • recall it.

  • Equally important, you're also less likely to adequately apply the information come test

  • day.

  • Remember, performing well on a test isn't just a matter of knowing the information,

  • but also understanding its context and how to apply it.

  • You will drastically reduce the time it takes to learn and memorize if you're able to

  • slot each individual piece into a coherent structure.

  • Memorizing loosely related facts is of little utility.

  • Number three, Lay the Foundations First. This tip is based on the Pareto Principle,

  • also known as the 80/20 rule, which states that 80% of the effects come from the 20%

  • of causes.

  • Applied to Anki flashcards, this means being efficient with how you studyfocus on

  • the highest yield information such that on test day, you've optimized your chances

  • of scoring well.

  • Often times, students get caught up in smaller details which are low-yield.

  • Remember that a mental scaffolding and foundation of basics is essential.

  • Simple models, after all, are easier to comprehend and quickly review.

  • From there, you can fill in the details as you progress.

  • Number four, Follow the Minimum Information Principle. The Minimum Information Principle reminds

  • us that simple is easy, and that simple cards are easier to review and schedule.

  • Consider this.

  • If a single card has two sub-items, you need to keep repeating the card to keep the more

  • difficult item in your memory.

  • However, if you split this single card into two separate cards, each can be repeated at

  • their own pace, ultimately saving you time in the long term.

  • This is arguably the biggest offense of most students when they first begin using Anki.

  • Most students make very complex cards that could be broken down into a dozen or more

  • sub-items.

  • I was guilty of doing this for much of medical school.

  • Some may argue that since the number of cards increases, it's ultimately less beneficial.

  • You must keep in mind that the total number of repetitions will decrease over time.

  • By sticking with a complex card with multiple sub-items, you're more likely to (1) forget

  • the more difficult sub-item repeatedly, (2) repeat the card in excessively short intervals,

  • or (3) remember only a part of the complex card.

  • Number five, Cloze Deletions Are Your Best Friend. I used Anki for several months before learning

  • about Cloze deletions.

  • Once I did, they quickly became my favorite type of card.

  • Cloze deletions are essentially fill-in-the-blank questions.

  • You can make the blank as short or long as you want.

  • I go over the shortcuts, formatting, and details on how to use Cloze deletions in a previous

  • video.

  • If you're finding it difficult to stick with the minimum information principle, then

  • Cloze deletions are a great tool to break your bad habits.

  • They're also incredibly efficient to create, as you can copy text from your powerpoint

  • or notes and create Cloze cards in just seconds.

  • Number six, Use Images, Photos, & Figures. Your memory is much more efficient at retaining

  • visual than textual information.

  • It makes sensewe've evolved over millions of years and only had written language for

  • a small percentage of our existence.

  • Images are particularly beneficial for certain subjects, like anatomy or chemistry.

  • That being said, I'd argue that even for more text-based subjects, images are still

  • warranted.

  • When creating your Anki cards, try to find an image for most of your cards.

  • It doesn't always have to be exactly related to the card, either.

  • If the topic of the card makes you think of something unrelated, find an image of it.

  • While this may take upfront time and investment, over the long term it greatly reduces your

  • learning time.

  • Be generous with inserting images into Anki.

  • Go on Google images, search for something relevant, and quickly copy/paste it or screenshot

  • into Anki.

  • Knowing your shortcuts will save you loads of time here.

  • If you have a diagram you want to test yourself on, like the Kreb's cycle, you can block

  • certain segments of the image and create cards that way.

  • The best way to do this is the Image Occlusion Enhanced plugin for Anki.

  • I go over how to install and use it in a previous video. Link in the description below.

  • Creating Anki cards and optimizing your learning in medical school is no easy task.

  • It took me years of experimentation and tweaking to finally get consistent and excellent results

  • that allowed me to match into a hyper competitive surgical subspecialty.

  • If you aren't getting the results you want in university or medical school, our tutors

  • at MedSchoolInsiders.com can help.

  • Whether it's the MCAT, USMLE Step 1, or any other pre-med or medical school test,

  • we can help.

  • Our tutors scored in the top percentiles and can help you do the same.

  • If you regularly watch our YouTube videos, chances are you know how heavily we emphasize

  • the importance of systems in generating desirable results.

  • Our tutoring is no different.

  • We've painstakingly taken months crafting the systems in place to provide the best quality

  • tutoring.

  • We take a holistic approach, examining your test taking strategies, study methods, road blocks and sticking points,

  • and customize a tailored plan to optimize your performance on test day.

  • Visit MedSchoolInsiders.com to learn more.

  • This is the end of Part 2.

  • In the third and final part, we'll finish up with additional best practices for your

  • Anki card creation.

  • If you found these tips useful, then you definitely don't want to miss the last part.

  • Anki is a beast of a program, so let me know down below if you have any other questions

  • and I'll do my best to answer them.

  • New videos every Saturday morning, and I'm going to spend the first hour after the video uploads answering your questions, so make

  • sure you're subscribed and you have the notification bell enabled.

  • Much love to you all, and I will see you guys in part three.

If you're a pre-med or medical student, you've likely heard of Anki.

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13個步驟,以更好的ANKI閃存卡|第1/2部分。 (13 Steps to Better ANKI Flashcards | Part 1/2)

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    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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