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  • welcome to eat sleep dreaminess.

  • Today we're looking at American slang versus British slang so that you can tell the difference between a quid and a buck and a manner on the hood.

  • I can't wait, guys.

  • Let's get going.

  • All right, let's get going straight away.

  • Now I'm gonna give you the standard word, and then I'm gonna give you the slang alternatives.

  • All right?

  • So let's get going with number one.

  • Mouth is the standard word in British slang.

  • We have a lot of British slang words, but one way you could say mouth is cake hole, cake hole.

  • That's right.

  • The whole where you put the cake.

  • Now, what is that in American English?

  • I said pie hole, Of course.

  • A pie hole.

  • I love it.

  • A cake Hold of race English on a pie hole in America.

  • Why?

  • I don't know why.

  • Just that's what we say.

  • Right?

  • So you might say this.

  • Shut your pile, Tom.

  • You I told you once Shut your pie hole shut.

  • Real good job any day.

  • Shut Open your rubio.

  • I'm sure my file when you show you can go.

  • Okay.

  • Enough fighting over here, So Okay.

  • Cold British English pie hole.

  • American.

  • Okay, What about one single unit of money?

  • Well, in British English, a pound is a quit and quit Q u.

  • I d quit.

  • But in American English, one single Donna is a buck bu ck buck.

  • So I might say, Could I borrow a quit in British, English and American English?

  • You might ask for a buck.

  • So can I borrow Buck?

  • Do you guys have a slang term for one single unit currency in your language?

  • Let me know in the comments below, Okay, house your house in British slang, we might say, Gaffe, your Gaff In London, Modern London Stein, they might say, Man's yard Manzi.

  • Right now this is very young.

  • I personally wouldn't say it, but you might hear if you're in London in American English, a home or house would be a Crip, A crib, like a baby, right?

  • Our baby starts off, we put them in a crib.

  • That's the same is your house right?

  • So the slang term for house is crib in America.

  • MTV had a TV program called MTV Cribs on.

  • They took us around famous people's houses.

  • So if it was in Britain, a remake, it would be NTV gaffes doesn't quite sound so cool.

  • Inspiration ish and TV gaffes?

  • Well, not quite as cool, but anyway, OK, an example Sentence.

  • There's a really nice partner in my Gaff.

  • We can go there.

  • There's a really nice park near my Gaff.

  • We can go there.

  • Okay, let's take the word friend, friend.

  • Now there are lots of alternatives for friend has lots of slang terms in British English.

  • We might say, mate, that's the most common way to say it.

  • So mate or bro is possible.

  • Or fam for modern London English fan would be used in American English You've got homey on.

  • Then you got bro, which I think would be used in both American and British slang.

  • Personally, I would never say homey, I've not really heard it used much in British English.

  • There are lots of other alternative slang words for a friend, but these are the main ones, right?

  • So he's all presentence.

  • All right, mate.

  • How's it going?

  • All right, mate.

  • How's it going?

  • Okay.

  • Your area.

  • Your area?

  • That's the standard red or neighborhood in American English.

  • Well, in American English neighborhood is shortened hood.

  • So your area the place you live could be your hood.

  • Now I know that has certain quality ations in America.

  • So any American viewers watching?

  • What other slang terms do you have for your your neighborhood?

  • Not just hood, but anything else in British English, we would say manner.

  • That's quite old school word at your manner, your area or in modern London, slang again, your ends, your ends.

  • Now these words have certain connotations, and there's just definitely a certain tribal aspect to them, like these are This is my manner.

  • So, like, you know, this is different from your manner, like we're too different from were from two different places.

  • Now, if you don't want to think like that in a kind of tribal way, then you could just say area.

  • Just use the normal word, that standard word for it, which is would be area, right?

  • So if you don't want to use that kind tribal language, then you could just use the standard form of area.

  • So, to be honest, I wouldn't say ends or manner.

  • I don't see London like that.

  • I don't see you know the city like that.

  • First, some people, that is important.

  • Okay, so you know it depends on who you are and what kind of what kind of language you want to use.

  • If I was asking where someone was from, I would say, Oh, what area you from?

  • Or maybe what neighborhood you from?

  • I might borrow the American English word, but I wouldn't say what manner you formal.

  • What ends you from?

  • But some people do like to use those words.

  • Okay, let's take the word tired.

  • Tired now, In British English, we would say knack.

  • It may.

  • I am knackered.

  • Perfect word.

  • I love that word.

  • You might also say shattered a swell home shattered in American slang.

  • You're probably more likely to say beat.

  • I'm beat.

  • You know what?

  • I'm beats, man.

  • I'm beat, Knock it or shattered in British English Beat in American English.

  • Okay, what about excited?

  • Let's say you're going to a concert tonight on your excited in British lamb, we would say buzzing.

  • I'm buzzing for the concert tonight.

  • I'm excited.

  • You might say, pumped as well.

  • I'm pumped for the concert tonight in American English.

  • I think they would say hyped.

  • I'm hyped or an amped I'm amped, hyped or amped.

  • Now, of course, it is possible to use those impression wish I have heard them before, but I think generally speaking, we would we would use buzzing.

  • That's the word that I hear most commonly so example sentence on buzzing about the concert tonight I'm buzzing about the constant tonight.

  • Okay, Standard word is to share the bill in British English, we would say to split the bill.

  • All right, so if that were the bill comes in that should we respect the bill?

  • Guys, shwee shwee share it in American English, they would say to go Dutch.

  • So when the bill arrives, they would say, Should we go Dutch?

  • It means to show you share the bill.

  • Now again, that's something that you might use in British English.

  • But probably you just say, split the bill Police officer now in American English it's a cop, right?

  • It's a cop, but in British ing, this would probably say copper or Bobby as well.

  • That's another term that you might hear, but yeah, copper.

  • There are, of course, loads of slightly ruder terms.

  • We won't go into those today, but yeah, cop to copper.

  • Let's take the adjective angry, angry now in American English, they would just say I'm pissed.

  • I'm pissed.

  • Slightly route, OK, in British English.

  • Pissed means drunk.

  • So we add a proposition to make it angry.

  • So it's pissed off.

  • You're pissed off, man.

  • I am Super Pierre stuff with my boss today, huh?

  • You be angry.

  • Your bus.

  • Okay, What about the adjective?

  • Pleased?

  • Pleased.

  • If you're pleased you're happy with something in American English, they would be stoked.

  • Sounds kind of like a search term to me.

  • Like yo and stoked like I just got a wave.

  • I'm stoked.

  • Okay.

  • Where is in British?

  • English?

  • You'd be chuffed.

  • Chuffed to bits will be there full time.

  • So I'm chuffed to bits.

  • I caught a wave.

  • I'm very chuffed to bits.

  • So yeah, the difference Arena, American Surfer And the British effort one will be stoked and there won't be chuffed to bits.

  • Okay?

  • And finally drunk the additive drunk.

  • Now there are hundreds of terms on both sides American English and British English for this talk about a few of them.

  • So in American English, maybe wasted or trashed those typically American that I think that I think of where is in British English, you might say, wasted a trashed.

  • Probably, though, you would say, hammered, battered yet words like that.

  • So, yeah, a few differences there.

  • Okay, You ready for a quiz?

  • Now, I'm gonna give you a sentence, and I want you to decide.

  • Is it British English or American English?

  • Good luck.

  • Um, how did you do?

  • Was that okay?

  • I hope that one.

  • Well, if there are any more slang terms that, you know, police put them into the comments.

  • Blow American or British English.

  • I'd love to hear them guys.

  • Remember, I've got my by two British English coming up really, really soon.

  • As soon as it's available.

  • I've put a link in the description.

  • Below is gone.

  • 80 said of British slang, plus loads of other interesting language and cultural features.

  • You're gonna love it.

  • Come with you to see it.

  • All right, guys.

  • Thank you so much.

welcome to eat sleep dreaminess.

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英國語與美國語的比較 101 (BRITISH vs AMERICAN SLANG 101)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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