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  • It's pronounced: Grenada. Jingling....

  • It's time to learn Geography Now!

  • Hey everyone, I'm your host Barby.

  • Well, we reached our seventh Carribean country: Grenada!

  • As you know, each Carribean country kind of has a little quirk that they're known for,

  • and now we reach "The Spice Island".

  • We'll explain why in a bit, but first:

  • Well, we're back in the Carribean, let's just jump into it.

  • Grenada is the southernmost Carribean archipelago nation located in what is called the Windward Islands

  • at the tip of the Grenadine Chain, right below St. Vincent and the Grenadines,

  • and less than 150 kilometres away from the tip of Venezuela,

  • or Trinidad and Tobago in the south.

  • Grenada is made up out of three main islands:

  • Carriacou, Petite Martinique and the largest one, Grenada.

  • In addition, the country owns a little over 20 smaller unhabited or barely inhabited or partially inhabited

  • or privately inhabited islands,

  • like Ronde Island, Caille Island, Large Island, Saline Island and Frigate Island and Diamond Island.

  • Diamond Island, ooh, I never realized how perfect those two words sound together.

  • Diamond Island!

  • Thanks, I needed a title for my new novel.

  • Grenada is divided into six parishes, each named after a saint,

  • whereas Carriacou and Petit Martinique hold a dependency status,

  • with the capial and largest city St. George's.

  • That's right: not St. George, St. George's.

  • What excactly they referencing in terms of his ownership for George, I have no idea,

  • but it's his town.

  • Hey, maybe that's what they're talking about: St. George's town.

  • This is also where the largest and only international airport, St. George's Maurice Bishop International, can be found.

  • Pearls Airport used to be the main airport, but then it kind of devolved into a go-kart racetrack

  • and Soviet aircraft graveyard where cows can elect the grace.

  • About 94% of the population lives along the coasts of Grenada Island

  • and are interconnected by the Main Road that loops all the way around the entire domain.

  • Otherwise, some noticable spots in Grenada might include St. George's Market Square,

  • Fort Frederick, the walking tunnel between the Carenage and the seaports.

  • The Cardenage in itself is awesome too.

  • The Underwater Sculpture Park, Fort George overlooking the city of St. George's,

  • and everywhere you find the hurricane Ivan destroyed buildings that add a sort of charm to Grenada's townlife.

  • Check out this channel right here, Goats on the road, they have an extensive series on Grenada

  • that shows the beautiful sites and most of these places are mentioned.

  • And with that promotion done and said, let's explain why this place is called The Spice Islands, shall we?

  • Now, at first glance, you would assume that the Carribean islands are pretty much the same

  • in physical make up, but in many cases that couldn't be further from the truth.

  • Now, although they were all formed by volcanic activity, not all the islands in the Carribean came out with the same features.

  • This is why you have specific, regional designations for the Carribean island clusters,

  • like the Greater Antilles, the Lesser Antilles, the Lucayan, Leeward and Windward Islands

  • as well as the Leeward Antilles.

  • This is why places like flat, boggy Barbudo looks almost nothing like volcanic, lake-boiling Dominica.

  • Grenada is the last and final island chain in the Grenadines, known for being rocky, tropical islands

  • with more volcanic activity, as their northern cousins have mostly hollocene and extinct volcanoes.

  • Grenada host two main volcanoes: the tallest point Mount Saint Catherine

  • and Kick 'em Jenny, located right in the middle of the sea.

  • I'm not even joking, look it up, that really is what it's called.

  • Now finally, let's answer that question.

  • If you look at a zoomed satellite map of Grenada you'll notice that unlike the other islands

  • Grenada isn't overtaken by large patches of geometrically cultivated crop fields.

  • But don't be fooled. Those open areas that look like large, lush, green forests

  • are actually nutmeg plantations.

  • Out of all the Carribean islands, thanks to the extremely rich soil, Grenada is known for being The Spice Island

  • because they are the world's second largest producers of nutmeg efter Indonesia.

  • Indonesia. A country that is like, over 2000 times the size in population

  • and 5000 times the size in land area.

  • They are also the only country that produces prime quality Mace.

  • In addition, they also grow quite a bit of cloves and cinnamon.

  • Many people who visit say that when walking through the country

  • you can actually smell the spice in the air constantly.

  • It's like walking through a scented candle

  • the size of an entire tropical island...

  • Other food crops are grown throughout the country, including breadfruit,

  • which is used to make the national dish Oil Down: a conglomeration of spices, salted meat and veggies and breadfruit.

  • Grenada is a conveniatly well-stocked island thanks to the high average annual rainfall

  • at over 300 centimeters.

  • You have these consistently flowing streams and rivers and waterfalls, such as the famous Seven Sisters Falls

  • and the longest river Saint John's river.

  • Animals like armadillos, agouties, monkeys and the national animal, the rare Grenadian dove

  • can be found scampering about in the interior forests.

  • There is a catch though.

  • Grenada is kind of like right in the path of hurricane territory.

  • The most damaging ones of hit being hurricanes Ivan and Emily back in 2004 and 2005.

  • Otherwise, other noticable natural spots might include Sunnyside and Hyde Pard Tropical Gardens,

  • Sandy Island, Grand Etang National Park, Morne Rouge Bay, Grand Anse and Lavera Beaches,

  • Black Bay Beach with Amerindian markings, Lake Antoine, great for birdwatching.

  • Oh, and you can enjoy it all with some Clark's Court rum.

  • Some of the locals like it, some don't, but hanging with them will be the best, no matter what you drink.

  • Here's some more on them:

  • Grenadians. That's wht you call them. Like Canadians.

  • Not "Grenadans" - Grenadians. Got it? Good.

  • Grenada might seem like a typical Carribean country but if you go back to the 70's,

  • things got a little weird.

  • First of all, Grenada has about 113 thousand people

  • and about twice as many ethnic Grenadians live abroad outside of Grenada

  • meaning that there are more Grenadians outside of Grenada than in it.

  • Over 80% of the population comes from black, African descent, about 10% are mixed, 4% are Indian,

  • like from India, and the rest are other groups including whites and indigenous Carribean peoples.

  • They also use the east Caribbean dollar, they use the type G British-style outlet

  • and they drive on the left side of the road.

  • Now, you might say "Hm, that's interesting, why is there a noticable Indian population?"

  • Well, as you'll soon find out in a future video coming up,

  • basically the British kind of brought them over in colonial times, as indentured servants and well,

  • they kind of just, made their home.

  • Made? You know, they kind of had to!

  • Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you know what I mean.

  • Essentially, the British didn't, like, go, until 1974...

  • I mean, kind of, there's still kind of like a Commonwealth.

  • ... when Grenada joined the sovreign spotlight.

  • For about five years, thing were kind of weakly transitioning, and then this came in

  • and kind of flipped the script entirely.

  • Maurice Bishop ousted the prime minister in 1979 and this guy was a total marxist

  • and immideatly made ties to other sommunist block countries like Cuba, Nicaragua,

  • as well as The Soviet Union and East Germany,

  • back when those things were things.

  • Nonetheless, Maurice made it very clear that Grenada would not be a Soviet block state,

  • just an interactive cooperator.

  • Long story short: his own cabinet started to hate him,

  • they killed him, and just as things were about the get buckwild,

  • The Organization Of East Carribean States and 600 US medical students made an appeal to an US intervention

  • and in 1983 paratroopers and batallions and even deltaforce came in, and it was like:

  • Hey!

  • Stop it.

  • Fine.

  • And then, Margaret Thatcher was like:

  • Hey!

  • That's not cool.

  • But, eeeh, I guess they got the job done.

  • And then the UN was like:

  • Hey, we unanimously disapprove.

  • But then a year later, they were like:

  • Eeeh, I guess they're back together again and peaceful... Whatever, fine.

  • 'MERICUH!

  • Sometimes destructive intervention leads you to freedom!

  • Keyword: sometimes.

  • I'm just reporting what happened in the 80's.

  • Anyway!

  • Because of the short, blipping communism, Grenadian culture has always had a slight, historical controversy

  • controversy-undertone that other Carribean states quite don't have.

  • I mean, all the Carribean states do have some kind of controversy,

  • but not like partying with East Germany officials-controversy.

  • Noneofhteless, they love reggae, saca and calypso music.

  • You know, how as a kid your parents kind of forces you into taking piano lessons?

  • Well, in Grenada, in many parts, it's still drum classes.

  • Again!

  • Grenadians are also known for being the inventors of Jab Jab music and culture, which sometimes involves

  • overing yourself in tar and oil with masks and chains, it's confusing.

  • The funny thing is, historically, Grenada was subject to both the British and French colonial powers,

  • until, eventually, the British kind of gained control.

  • Although English is kind of the official language, to this day, the French influence lingures ever so slightly

  • in things like many people have French surnames or Grenada having two different types of patwa dialects:

  • one derrived from English and the other from French.

  • Also, you can tell faith-wise.

  • Nearly half of the Grenadians are either Catholic or Protestant,

  • harkening back to the respective denominations of their former colonizers.

  • Also, it explains why they celebrate French-inspired Carnival,

  • which is celebrated in August, not February,

  • but Brittish-influenced cricket is the most popular sport.

  • Otherwise, some other notable Grenadians would probably include people like:

  • Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamiltion,

  • Calypso artist singer Francisco, or the "Mighty Sparrow",

  • Jennifer Hosten was the first black woman to win the Miss World-competition in 1970,

  • Alleyne Francique,

  • Kiriani James,

  • Hollis Mapp,

  • Eric Gairy,

  • Daniel William

  • and Keith Mitchell.

  • It's interesting to see how Grenada has progressed into the country that it is today in such a short amount of time.

  • Of course, they had a few others involved in the process.

  • Now, you can probably tell that Grenada has gone through quite a few revolutionazing transitions

  • in its past half century of history.

  • First of all, the UK has always close ties to Grenada even after they let go.

  • Grenada is still classified as a Commonwealth, so ever so often the Queen sends her regards

  • and relief aid when necessary.

  • Prince Harry also kind of visited to check up on them recently.

  • No surprise, the US and China have been jumping on trade development and investment for decades,

  • and the US houses a significant population of citizens of Grenadian descent.

  • When it comes to their best friends though, most of the Grenadians I talked to have said two countries:

  • Cuba and Trinidad and Tobago.

  • Cuba is kind of the remnant of the former communist years that still maintained close ties.

  • The country offers scholarships and excellent medical benfits, specifically to Grenadians,

  • whereas Trinidad and Tobago is kind of like the big brother, just down south.

  • Many Grenadians have family in Trinidad and likewise Trinidadians in Grenada,

  • and they've had a healthy, yet slightly competitive friendship for centuries.

  • In conclusion, Grenada is like a split French/English- influenced island that smells really good,

  • dabbling communism at one point, and dances to calypso.

  • Stay tuned - Guatemala is coming up next.

It's pronounced: Grenada. Jingling....

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現在的地理格瑞那達 (Geography Now! Grenada)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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