Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • every single one of us here.

  • Every single one of us here can change the world in three seconds.

  • That's right.

  • Three seconds.

  • And it begins with the decision that you and I make every single day a decision that is often confusing, rushed and almost always un intuitive.

  • I want everyone here to think about the last time that you walked up with that Starbucks cup that had a lid and this leave.

  • Maybe it looked a little bit of liquid inside of off it.

  • And you walked up to have been that looked like this.

  • What were you feeling?

  • What was going through your mind?

  • Did you feel a little bit subconscious?

  • Did it make you feel a little bit stupid or did you completely ignore it?

  • I know a lot of people walk up to that being and they look left and right and contaminate the that three second decision is where this all begins.

  • When we walk up to that bin.

  • What actually happens is that we get this decision wrong about 70% of the time, so we only get it right about 30%.

  • Let's really think about that 70% of the time imagine you're taking a flight from here to San Francisco, and 70% of the time you might end up in New York, Tokyo or Chittagong, Bangladesh.

  • And so when we contaminate, by taking the wrong decision, buildings have no choice.

  • I've been sending you to landfill, and this is where a lot of misconceptions begin.

  • A lot of us actually are convinced and believe that recycling doesn't really work.

  • I've tried my best, but the city just dumps it into landfills.

  • So why am I doing this?

  • But what actually happens is we get it right.

  • Believe 30% of the time and recycling facilities cannot take that amount of contamination because it jams up their machinery, causing millions of dollars of damage.

  • When you look at the problem on a global level, it gets even scarier.

  • The World Bank estimated in 2011 that 98% 98% off whatever you and I generate, end up in landfills, ocean or we burn it.

  • All of those materials that we've put in so much effort in extracting out off our fragile, finite earth, we end up burning it.

  • We're dumping it in these landfills for the longest time.

  • We've also sent that waste and we've brushed it under the rug.

  • We shipped it to willing importers like China that have really helped cocoon us from these harsh realities off our waste.

  • But they've had enough.

  • They have imposed bands and they're shutting their doors.

  • They don't want it anymore.

  • And following China, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, in every other country that we used to send our ways too, doesn't want it anymore.

  • We here in North America, Europe and other countries are really forced to rethink the way that we've been recycled.

  • And we simply cannot half ass this anymore for a very long time.

  • We've also believed that somehow somewhere, our waste provides them with an income.

  • This is what I'd like to call rock bottom humanity.

  • We've negated entire communities to mountains upon mountains of trash, exposing them to toxic chemicals, open syringes and various viruses and diseases just so that we could get rid of her will also let you in on another dirty secret.

  • Most of these waste management These recycling companies are not in the business of recycling our trash.

  • They're in the business off hauling our trash from one location to another getting paid once and then dumping it into landfills that most of the times they own themselves to getting paid twice for one single piece of waste.

  • And so when we got into this field off garb ology, it's an actual fuel gauge.

  • Okay, what we saw was that building's really didn't know how good they were doing, because the only data they actually had it was from these waste management company.

  • And that really got us thinking that we measure every single thing.

  • We measure electricity so that we could save it.

  • We measure water so that we could conserve it.

  • Heck, in this day and age, we measure our footsteps so that we could live a healthier life.

  • But why not trash?

  • There's no censor or way to measure track.

  • And how do we expect to reduce something that we don't measure?

  • There is one process, though.

  • It's very technologically advanced, so I need you to bear with me.

  • As I explain the most advanced process to measure waste by buildings.

  • It's by digging through trash.

  • They hire people to come into the building, tear garbage bags apart, and then they write a report.

  • And once this postmortem report is submitted.

  • Sustainability experts get together to figure out mainly one thing.

  • Why couldn't you and I get that three second decision correctly?

  • And so what we really understood was that this entire process takes a very long time the building's measure, this waste so that they could draft out proposals, change bins labels just so that we could make that decision correctly.

  • But this year long process, by the time it's done, the brands have changed their packaging.

  • Cities have introduced three new regulations, and what could once belong in their blue bin now belongs completely somewhere else.

  • And so we really asked herself, How could we measure waste efficiently?

  • But at the same time let people know that dynamically as the rules change as the markets change so that it doesn't end up in landfills?

  • And so most of you are as as we, you know, whenever we go to a new city, my team and I, we're a bit crazy.

  • We're a bit weird, you know, You guys notice the architecture of the landmark, but when we walk up, we go to a new city.

  • We notice the garbage bins.

  • That's what we love and So we noticed the symbols.

  • How hard did it take somebody to actually swore?

  • Trash out?

  • And so it wasn't long before with our robotics background.

  • We tried to tackle and create a solution for this, and that's exactly what we did.

  • We said, You know what?

  • People don't get this right.

  • Let's throw them out of the loop.

  • Let's automate this entire process and that's exactly what we did.

  • We built a bin that you could walk up and you throw your item and it puts it into the right.

  • When we said, Let's take that even further, Uh, that was a good club.

  • It is gonna get better.

  • Uh, so we took that idea.

  • We said, Let's apply that to recycling facilities so that we could sort out the entire city's weeks.

  • And then we said that same concept could be applied to clean up our oceans, but then it sort of struck us that these air, not sustainable solutions.

  • It's a Band Aid on a much, much deeper problem at the source.

  • And so, rather than handing somebody the fish, we really knew that we have to teach people how to fit.

  • And so what we created it's called Oscar.

  • Oscar is an aye aye, that sits right behind the garbageman.

  • Using a eye.

  • It sees what you have in your hand, and it makes that decision very, very intuitive.

  • So if you have a Starbucks cup will ask you two separated and sort it out until you do it.

  • You get it right.

  • Oscar gives you a reward.

  • Okay.

  • So, really, this is the first time anybody is being incentivized to recycle correctly.

  • If you put it into the wrong Been, I hope you don't, because this Oscar does get grouchy.

  • So they will.

  • It will shout at you.

  • And so we took this entire Oscar experience and we went to university.

  • Then we wanted to see how would people react when we proposed this new behavior change and what we saw with phenomenal what we saw with students were willing to steal a trash from you in order to get that reward.

  • Thank you.

  • You're probably also wondering, how does this this a I actually work this Oscar.

  • How does it see what I have in my hand?

  • And so it sees the world similarly to us.

  • But Oscar kind of focuses on garbage a little bit more than us.

  • That's what it lives and breathes on.

  • Every single day it learns, similar to how you teach a child where you teach a puppy, a new trick.

  • You.

  • If it's done the right thing, you give it a reward.

  • That's what we do.

  • We showed millions of times what a coffee cup could look like.

  • If it gets it wrong, then we get a chance to grouch at it.

  • And it learned similar to how we learn and by placing Oscar at malls, Universities, airport in San Francisco, Calgary, Toronto, Vancouver.

  • What we've seen is that 30% where you and I for that has gone to 91%.

  • 91% is unheard off.

  • And what that actually means is that one Oscar, just one Oscar every single year is going to be eliminating about 20 cars worth of emissions, one Oscar, 20 cars.

  • And our plan in the next five years is to provide 200,000 Oscars, which will enable and eliminate emissions from four million cars every single year.

  • That is the power off education and nudging people at the source.

  • Now, as I wrap up my trash talk here nothing.

  • I really want to go back to those Those three seconds.

  • Those three seconds will help eliminate and divert this waste away from landfills, oceans and Third World countries.

  • Those three seconds will eliminate emissions from four million cars.

  • Those three seconds can alter lives of Children that are forced to work in these landfills.

  • Those three seconds.

  • You know what?

  • I would really, really appreciate it if everybody could do me a big favor and stand up and rise with me here.

  • And we're going to count down from 321 Okay.

  • Ready?

  • Three.

  • That's all it takes.

  • Thank you.

every single one of us here.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

3秒實現零浪費 - Hassan Murad - TEDxSFU (3 Seconds To Zero Waste | Hassan Murad | TEDxSFU)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字