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  • Hi, I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS. We are happy to see you.

  • It`s Monday, April 7 and we are going all over the world today starting in Afghanistan.

  • There was a big election there on Saturday. One that would determine the country`s next president.

  • Afghanistan`s been led by President Hamid Karzai since 2001.

  • That`s when the U.S.-led coalition kicked out Afghanistan`s former rulers, the Taliban who were protecting terrorists.

  • The Taliban threatened voters in the run up to this election with violence.

  • At least 20 people were killed by insurgent attacks across the country, but that combined with bad weather couldn`t keep people from the voting booths.

  • There were a couple frontrunners for the title of president.

  • Preliminary results will be announced at the end of the month, but some say that no matter who wins, the people will.

  • Standing in the rain, some waiting for hours, the people of Afghanistan lined up, each holding their voting card, their ticket to democracy.

  • We vote for him to win the future, we want to build the future for this man.

  • It was hope for the President Karzai would provide that future during his 12 years in office.

  • But it`s now his successor who this Afghans are banking on.

  • How does it feel to be here tonight?

  • Fantastic. Proud. Happy. Successful.

  • I feel really good because I believe today is my day.

  • Today is the day, which is people of Afghanistan can go and vote it freely.

  • Following weeks of high profile attacks and Taliban threats to disrupt this elections, the capital was unlocked down.

  • Every man, woman and child searched before entering the polling station.

  • Inside voters queued again, this time to deep their forefinger into the ink, before being given the ballot papers.

  • Today I came here to select my next president and I hope to be a good person and to help the people and to survive the people and to bring change in Afghanistan.

  • Voter turned out exceeded expectations.

  • Well and 50 percent of eligible voters cast their ballot.

  • Remarkably, one third of them were women.

  • Several polling stations ran out of ballots and voting hours were extended by an hour, due to heavy turnouts.

  • The resilience of these people is truly inspiring.

  • Despite all the attacks and threats of violence, Afghans have turned out in encouraging numbers to cast their vote in polling stations around the country.

  • They strongly believe that after so many years of war, they too deserve a peaceful and brighter future.

  • Democratic elections are also taking place in what`s known as the world`s largest democracy.

  • India is officially a federal republic. Its population is 1.2 billion people, the second highest population in the world.

  • And because more than 814 million of them are eligible to vote, the election that starting in India today is being called the biggest election the world`s ever seen.

  • Opinion polls show that the political party that`s led India for the last ten years could be in trouble.

  • The economy has slowed down, there`ve been some high profile scandals involving corruptions.

  • And about 30 percent of the population leaves in poverty, so change is in the air.

  • But with so many people voting this election happens in phases.

  • The last one of those ends on May 12, and the results should be in by May 16.

  • The plane hasn`t been found, but the mystery about what happened to Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 has gotten deeper.

  • A Malaysian government official says after the plane`s transponders stopped sending tracking information,

  • the jet flew a wayward path around Indonesian airspace.

  • Was it taken this way intentionally to avoid radar?

  • As investigators consider that, two search ships might have picked up a signal over the weekend.

  • They were in two different search areas in the Indian Ocean.

  • What they heard might have been the ping that flight data recorders sent off after a plane goes down.

  • The ships can`t confirm, this is what they picked up and the batteries powering the signal only last a month or so.

  • The flight disappeared on March 8.

  • More ships are headed to this area`s west of Australia to listen in.

  • The search has been massive, the cost of doing it massive.

  • The search for Flight 370 will likely rank as the most expensive in history.

  • Think about it. The scope unprecedented. 21 nations, 80 ships, 61 aircrafts.

  • Now, most of the money coming from military training budget.

  • Think about it, that makes sense. You`ve got all of these countries usually spending money doing mock exercises.

  • This is something real. So money are coming from those training budgets.

  • Also, some from humanitarian budgets. And for the U.S., the money is now shifted, it`s coming from Navy operations in some cases.

  • So, the Pentagon originally allocated $4 million for the search. 3.2 million spent between the 2nd of March and the 24.

  • One source the military telling us, this general rule cost about $100,000 a day, this operation.

  • Some of these aircrafts, think about it, cost $10,000 an hour to operate.

  • Now, other countries are pitching. And these are the big Seven.

  • The big seven here: the Australians taking the lead, officially taking the lead of the investigation ending the week.

  • The prime minister there saying, everyone paying their own cost right now.

  • They are not keeping track, quite frankly.

  • They are really trying to get out there and solve this mystery.

  • So, if you do the back of the envelope math, based on what the U.S. is spending, we can estimate the search probably costing more than $21 million per month.

  • So, how does that compare with other aviation disasters?

  • Air France Flight 447 two years search after that crash in 2009.

  • That was about $50 million. TWA Flight 800, that was about 40 million, 1996, one of the longest investigations the NTSB ever conducted.

  • Swiss Air 111. This went down off the coast of Nova Scotia, in 1998.

  • Search recovery investigation took four years and cost $39 million.

  • Time for The Shoutout. In which Shakespearean play would you find the famous quote All the world is stage, and all the men and women merely players.

  • If though knowst it, shout it out! Is it, As You Like It, Much Ado about Nothing?, Twelfth Night or All`s Well That Ends Well. You`ve got three seconds, go.

  • This is a tough one, but the quote is from Shakespeare`s comedy As You Like It.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • Quick look at William Shakespeare by the numbers. We just named four of his 37 plays.

  • He wrote more than a million words and made up more than 1000 of them.

  • He was born 450 years ago this month, and his work has been translated into more than 80 languages.

  • It`s been performed in places and in front of audiences far beyond the globe theater in London.

  • This month marks William Shakespeare`s 450th birthday and people around the world are celebrating from Stratfordians to Syrians.

  • Yes, Syrians. 100 Syrian children have just performed an adaptation of King Lear in one of the world`s largest refugee camps located in Jordan.

  • The Zaatari Camp is home to over 100,000 Syrian refugees over half of whom are under the age of 18.

  • Many of the children are not educated and have never read or seen any of Shakespeare`s work,

  • but they are no strangers, of course, to the tragedy of the human condition.

  • And this particular play, a story of exile, a land divided by rival groups, a tale of human cruelty seems especially relevant.

  • While the refugee camp may seem like the unlikeliest of places to discover Shakespeare,

  • the playwright himself might not have thought so.

  • After all, mentioning faraway places was common in his place.

  • In both Macbeth and Otello, in fact, Shakespeare mentions the Syrian city of Aleppo.

  • Another reminder that Syria is one of the oldest centers of human civilization, which makes the current violence there seem even more tragic.

  • North, south and east - it`s a tridirectional roll call today.

  • In the land of 10,000 lakes we`ve got the Spartans on the roll.

  • They are watching at Rocori High School in Cold Spring, Minnesota.

  • In the South, right near Mobile Bay, Alabama, great to see the trodgents (ph) of Daphne High School in Daphne.

  • And northeastern New Jersey at Schalick High School, hello the Cougars watching in Pitts Grove.

  • When the game of Tetris came out in 1984, no one had a 65-inch HDLCDTV to play it on.

  • But even if someone did, this is better:

  • a Drexel University Associate professor worked with the Tetris company to make this happen in Philadelphia over the weekend.

  • People played the game from half a mile away.

  • LED lights were placed on the glass facade of a 29 stories skyscraper to make it possible to game on.

  • Don`t know yet if they broke their record, but when all the pieces fall together like this, the sky scrapers the limit.

  • There`s no question it was a blockbuster, it brought delight with delights and made for one fine Gameboy.

  • That`s our show for today, I hope the rest of yours is a great one. I`m Carl Azuz.

Hi, I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS. We are happy to see you.

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April 7, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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