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  • Hey Vsauce, Michael here.

  • I'm sorry. Look, I didn't name myself but apparently

  • Michael is the ninth most disliked baby name

  • for a boy -

  • according to a survey by BabyNameWizard.com

  • At least it didn't top the charts like the rhyming

  • a 'den' names - Jayden, Brayden, Aiden.

  • The most disliked

  • name for a baby girl, by the way, was

  • Nevaeh -

  • 'heaven' backwards.

  • Names can be more than just controversial - they can also be

  • just plain wrong, or misleading.

  • MISNOMERS

  • And I'm not talking about the daughter of Mr. Nomer.

  • Over the summer I went to Singapore

  • and I saw many many things. I saw

  • an infinity pool, the world's largest column-less glass house,

  • beautiful beautiful orchids, including

  • the laboratories where scientists genetically design custom orchids

  • and very very

  • humid air that condensed all over my cool glasses.

  • But even after I cleaned my glasses off

  • I didn't see any Lions.

  • In fact, it's believed that no Lions have ever

  • naturally lived

  • in Singapore, even though Singapore comes from a Malay word for

  • Lion City.

  • It's believed that in 1299 when Sang Nila Utama named Singapore,

  • he mistakenly thought that a tiger he saw was a Lion.

  • It's a misnomer.

  • But here

  • is the biggest mystery of them all, did I

  • really go to Singapore?

  • I mean, look at these photos.

  • That guy certainly looks like me

  • but he's not exactly like me.

  • I have made a video about misnomers

  • and that guy hasn't.

  • This photo was from May,

  • and since May I have been to Australia, New Zealand.

  • The guy in these photos has never been there.

  • I am similar

  • to that guy but he's not exactly

  • me.

  • We can resolve this problem by realising

  • that oranges are apples

  • You see, in Old English the word 'apple' was used to describe

  • apples, but also any fruit in general.

  • For instance, dates were 'finger apples' and bananas

  • were 'apples of paradise'. Cucumber's

  • were 'Earth apples'.

  • In French the word for 'apple' acted similarly,

  • giving us 'Earth apple' for the potato.

  • In the Middle Ages the old French word for

  • orange meant 'apple of the orange tree'.

  • And the Swedish word for orange still means 'apple'

  • from China because Orange's originated in the East.

  • But this leads us to an even bigger question: what came first

  • orange, the fruit or orange, the colour?

  • Well, the answer is neither.

  • The tree came first.

  • The word 'orange' comes from the Sanskrit word for the tree

  • that these fruits grow on.

  • Before being introduced

  • to these fruits the English-speaking world called this colour

  • not orange, but yellow-red.

  • The first recorded use of the word 'orange' to refer to the colour,

  • instead of the fruit, wasn't until 1512.

  • So the colour was named after the fruit,

  • which was named after the tree that it came from.

  • But what's a fruit?

  • Well, botanically a fruit is a part of a flowering plant that disseminates

  • seeds, like an apple or an orange or a lemon or a grape.

  • In cooking, because they're not sweet, we tend to call things like wheat grains

  • and bean pods

  • vegetables, even though they are actually fruits.

  • Vegetable is a culinary term for other edible parts of a plant that

  • aren't fruit, like roots or leaves.

  • Corn on the cob

  • tastes like a vegetable but scientifically

  • corn kernels are fruits,

  • which means that corn on the cob is really just a bunch

  • of fruits

  • packed together.

  • One of the veggies we put on our pizza

  • is the mushroom.

  • Of course, mushrooms aren't really

  • vegetables because they aren't even plants.

  • They're fungi.

  • Names can also be confusing because of Stigler's Law -

  • our tendency to name things

  • not after who discovered them, or originated them, but instead

  • to simply honour someone else.

  • Venn diagrams are cool.

  • They were named after John Venn in the 1880s,

  • although Leonhard Euler actually introduced them

  • in 1768.

  • And Avogadro's Constant?

  • Not actually discovered by Avogadro.

  • He proposed

  • that such a number could exist but it was a different guy

  • who discovered the exact figure.

  • Straight up misnomers

  • are my favorite.

  • French horns are not French

  • Your Funny bone is not a bone; it's a nerve.

  • The Ulnar nerve.

  • And this is not

  • Big Ben.

  • Nothing about this is officially called Big Ben.

  • Its real name is The Elizabeth Tower.

  • People often say that the bell inside is named Big Ben

  • but even that's not true.

  • The main bell inside Elizabeth Tower

  • is officially called The Great Bell.

  • The Great Bell's nickname is Big Ben

  • and we have since applied that nickname for a bell

  • to the entire tower.

  • Kosher salt isn't actually

  • kosher, it's just used to make things kosher,

  • to draw blood out of meat.

  • So really it should be called Koshering salt.

  • The Rocky Mountain Oyster of course is not

  • seafood -

  • it's a fried bull testicle.

  • Arabic Numerals are not

  • Arabic, they were invented in India but introduced

  • to Europe by Arab mathematicians.

  • Haley's comet is named after Edmund Hayley

  • but had been witnessed by people at least as early as 240 BC.

  • Peanuts are not nuts, they're legumes,

  • and coconuts are not nuts, they're drupes -

  • stone fruit, like cherries, apricots, peaches, etc.

  • French fries,

  • as they are especially known in America,

  • are not from America

  • but were probably named by British and American soldiers

  • during the First World War, who discovered them where they were likely

  • invented... Belgium.

  • Now since French was the official language of the Belgian Army,

  • the soldiers may have mistakenly thought they were in France.

  • Koala Bears are not bears, they just kind of look like they are

  • and egg plants don't grow eggs.

  • Eighteenth-century cultivators

  • simply thought they kind of resembled eggs.

  • Dry cleaning isn't dry at all,

  • it involves lots of wet liquids but just not water.

  • And, silly guy, hamburgers are not named after ham,

  • the pork product, they're named after Hamburg, Germany.

  • Probably because at

  • Hamburg citizens who emigrated to the US

  • and brought their minced beef patty, a Hamburg steak with them.

  • Guinea pigs are not pigs at all, they're just

  • similar looking to pigs - kind of.

  • And Greenland

  • isn't green land at all, it's believed that about a thousand years ago

  • Erik the Red named it Greenland hoping that the name would trick settlers

  • into coming over.

  • We drive on parkways

  • and park on driveways not because

  • work makers want to confuse us but because the park in parkways

  • refers not to stopping a car but to the nature parks

  • parkways often run along.

  • Skeuomorphs are design elements that

  • today are merely ornamental,

  • even though in the past originally

  • they had a purpose.

  • For instance, on a modern mobile phone

  • the icon for phone call is shaped like an

  • old phone.

  • The icon for e-mail

  • is shaped like an old snail mail envelope.

  • Or, when you take a camera phone picture,

  • you hear the sound of a mechanical shutter,

  • even if your phone doesn't have one that makes that noise.

  • Older cameras did,

  • so the new ones do too.

  • It's a skeuomorph.

  • Your own name is a kind of skeuomorph.

  • Let's call it a skeuonom.

  • It was necessary at birth

  • your parents gave it to you but before they knew exactly what you would be like

  • when you grew up.

  • You have changed since you were born

  • but your name has stayed the same.

  • When we called it

  • 'The Moon', we didn't know that we would find

  • other moons in the solar system. When you were named

  • no one knew how you would change, or what you would become, and you change

  • frequently.

  • You change many, many times

  • over the course of your life.

  • You learn things,

  • you forget things, you meet people, you stop talking to people.

  • You experience things for the first time, at a cellular level

  • millions of times a second you change costume,

  • cells die and new ones are born.

  • And, at the atomic level, with the exception of non-living

  • things, like tattoos and piercings,

  • every five years

  • pretty much every single atom in your body is replaced.

  • So to what degree is the future or past

  • you, really you now.

  • Robert M Martin

  • puts this in a really cool perspective in his book 'There Are Two

  • Errors in the the Title of This Book*'

  • "That person, who will have your name

  • in the very far future, will be connected only very tenuously to the present you.

  • The person will remember very few of your current experiences,

  • will be psychologically quite different, will have a body that resembles your

  • present one only a bit,

  • and contains almost none of the same matter.

  • So it seems that this person is the future you

  • only to a small degree.

  • In a way, in terms of memories and experiences in history,

  • you have more in common with a stranger today

  • than you do with yourself 10 or 20 years ago."

  • Martin goes even further, saying why be afraid of death

  • if the future you who dies will resemble you today

  • so little?

  • Well, to that I say

  • YOLO?

  • Well, it's probably more accurate to say

  • YOLOBLOMLMTAASOSBTDPWKEOBOIODAW-

  • CHEOBOITOD.

  • You only live once, but living once means living

  • many times, as a series of similar,

  • but technically different people, who know each other, but only in one direction,

  • and who can help each other, but only in the other direction.

  • And as always,

  • thanks for watching.

Hey Vsauce, Michael here.

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錯別字 (Misnomers)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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