Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • [Intro]

  • The Super Nintendo Classic edition is here.

  • It's pretty awesome that Nintendo is releasing all of their classic consoles and games in

  • a small portable unit.

  • With 21 games built directly into the system, it's hard for my wallet to say no.

  • I'm mostly excited for Zelda, Mario Kart, and Super Metroidthe games I used to

  • play back in my day.

  • I always had a video game time limit as a kid.

  • Before, I was supposed to go play outside or something else equally stupid.

  • But now that I'm an adult, I can play as much as I want, just nobody tell my mom.

  • There are two controllers included in the box this time around, instead of like last

  • year's original Nintendo Classic that just had one controller.

  • Multiplayer games are going to be a bigger deal this time around.

  • Plus, the cable for the controller is longer.

  • Nintendo listened.

  • This time around it's 56 inches or 1.4 meters for those of you with a measuring system that

  • makes sense.

  • I'll tear the controller down in just a second, but first let's dig into the console.

  • Quick trivia question for those who know, is Zelda a boy or a girl?

  • Let me know in the comments.

  • This thing is pretty sleek.

  • The Super Nintendo Classic edition is much smaller than the regular Super Nintendo.

  • There is no functional cartridge slot since all the games are now internal.

  • It does have both the power and reset buttons, and a plastic face that mimics the old controller

  • connectors.

  • On the back we have the HDMI output and a micro USB power port, which also comes included

  • in the box.

  • Now to actually plug in the controllers, the front insert pops off in a slightly annoying,

  • and very much still in the way fashion, to expose the two plugs.

  • I'll show you how to get rid of this in a second if that's your thing.

  • It's pretty easy.

  • On a normal YouTube channel, this is the point where the unboxing would be finished, but

  • on my channel though, it's not completely unboxed until the circuits are naked.

  • There are 4 rubber feet at the bottom of the console that pop off exposing 4 Philips head

  • screws.

  • The construction is incredibly simple.

  • Now that it's open, it almost looks exactly like the original Classic from last year.

  • The power switches are definitely different though.

  • I'll pop off the two Phillips head screws holding down that circuit board, and then

  • we have the standard run-of-the-mil switch for the power, and a little reset trigger

  • on the other side of the board.

  • This whole thing is pretty incredibly inexpensive to manufacture.

  • Let's hope that Nintendo actually makes enough of these this time around, because this would

  • make an epic Christmas present.

  • I'll leave a link in the description so you can check the inventory levels and the current

  • pricing.

  • Now that the power switch circuits are back into place, it's time to unplug the controller

  • cables from the motherboard.

  • These things are tight, and I always try to avoid pulling on wires directly, so getting

  • a metal tool under that little plastic lip help out.

  • It's probably safer not to use a razor blade though.

  • There are 4 screws holding down the metal plate over the motherboard.

  • This thing protects the motherboard, but also acts as a heat sink.

  • The processor has some thermal foam that reaches up and touches the bottom of the metal plate

  • to dissipate the heat that it accumulates while producing all the epic graphics that

  • the Super Nintendo requires.

  • One more screws holding down the motherboard to the plastic frame, and finally we get to

  • see the pretty simple brains of the Nintendo.

  • All of the included games are pre-loaded onto this cute little board.

  • I'll reassemble the whole contraption so we can tear down one of those controllers.

  • The motherboard had it's one screw, and then the metal heat sink has it's 4.

  • The two controller ribbons are back in place, and we get an inside look at the little plastic

  • door for the controller plugs.

  • If this thing is in your way, or you find it annoying, it's pretty easy to remove and

  • reattach again later if you want.

  • I'm going to leave mine attached so I don't lose it, but it's good to know it's removable

  • with just a gentle pull.

  • I'll reattach the ribbon cable that I pulled off earlier for those power buttons.

  • And the last thing that I want to point out that's pretty interesting is the LED from

  • this motherboard shines down into the smoky plastic below it, which then redirects the

  • light out the front opening of the console.

  • Kind of a cool design.

  • I'll toss the top housing back on over the body and screw it all back into place with

  • those 4 Philips head screws.

  • The rubber feet go back on top of those screw holes, and it's good to go.

  • The controller is next on our list of things to open up.

  • It's got hard plastic buttons everywhere except for the Select and Start buttons, which are

  • a grippy black rubber.

  • On the back of the controller we find 5 screw holes with the same silver Philips head screws

  • that we've been working with before.

  • Pulling off the back of the controller housing exposes the backside of the circuit board,

  • along with the corner trigger buttons.

  • The back housing also has extrusions, which I assume is to hold the motherboard firmly

  • in place as you're pressing buttons from the other side.

  • Both trigger buttons also have a unique design.

  • The plastic trigger can separate from the housing easy enough, and the button has a

  • separate board held up at a 90 degree angle with two wires leading down to the motherboard.

  • The cable leading to the controller is intertwined with these little plastic pegs.

  • I'll untangle that and flip around the circuit board to expose the buttons and how they work.

  • Each of these buttons has little black conductive pads, and when the rubber counterparts are

  • pressed into the contact on the circuit board, it completes the circuit and allows Mario

  • to move.

  • The exterior plastic buttons have little guiding pins in them, just like we saw on the Nintendo

  • Switch.

  • The buttons are all removable including the rubber Start and Select buttons, and the Arrow

  • direction pad.

  • I'll get all the rubber pads back in place.

  • These allow the buttons to compress and uncompress without any complex mechanisms, so it should

  • last quite a long while.

  • I'll get the motherboard back in place over the rubber and place the corner trigger buttons

  • back in the grooves they came from.

  • One more cool thing is that the cable leading out from the controller is intertwined with

  • those plastic pegs.

  • This allows the controller to be pulled and tugged a bit without putting any stress or

  • damage on the connector for the motherboard.

  • It can handle some abuse.

  • The back panel is now in place with it's 5 screws, and it's ready for me to play.

  • I'll be pretty awesome if Nintendo made a mini N64 next year.

  • What's your favorite Nintendo game, old or new?

  • Let me know down in the comments.

  • I'll have this Classic Super Nintendo system linked in the video description right below

  • this video if you want to get one of your own.

  • Thanks a ton for watching, and I'll see you around.

[Intro]

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

超級NES經典版!- 拆解-開箱-維修視頻 (Super NES Classic Edition! - Teardown - Unboxing - Repair Video)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字