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  • So you accidentally cats, um, bits of conversation between flight attendants and pilots, and it's like they're speaking another language.

  • Secret codes, abbreviations, seemingly meaningless phrases, Zulu packs.

  • And what on earth is gate Lies are they talking about?

  • May stand by for takeoff.

  • This will be interesting.

  • Number one George is flying the plane, but it's not the pilot's name.

  • Well, it could be.

  • But here, this is what the plane's autopilot system is called, so he's not named Auto.

  • George is programmed to follow a certain room, taking into consideration the wind conditions, turbulence and altitude.

  • Pilots normally used the autopilot after reaching the cruising altitude or after flying for more than 10 hours.

  • That's when they're required to have a rest.

  • Number two cleared for take off.

  • After the crew is done with the all system pre flight inspection, they're ready to head off.

  • That's when you can hear the pilot saying, cleared for takeoff.

  • Some decades, though, the pre takeoff phrase wasa bit word here.

  • Let's kick the tires and light the fires.

  • Number three spinners.

  • That's what crew members call passengers who turn up late and without in a science.

  • See, they look flustered and keep spinning around, trying to find an unoccupied place and some space in an overhead bin.

  • Four.

  • Cross check.

  • This expression is often announced over the intercom.

  • After hearing this phrase, flight attendants make sure that all the doors are armed.

  • This means that if they're open, the slide raft or escape slide will deploy automatically.

  • All the doors have to be armed before takeoff and disarmed before flight attendants open them after landing.

  • Five.

  • Jump seat.

  • These are the small seats flight attendants occupy when the plane takes off lands or travels through turbulence.

  • The name comes from the way a seat folds up right after a person gets up from it.

  • Kind of like seats at the movies.

  • Six.

  • There's a pilot in the jump seat.

  • No, he's not about to jump from the plane, though That would be fun.

  • It's actually pretty common that an off duty pilot or other flight personnel take jump.

  • See twin flying back to their home base.

  • Aviation Authority inspectors can also travel in fold up seats.

  • Some airlines may even offer jump seats.

  • Two pilots working for other companies.

  • Seven.

  • We're flying through an air pocket when most passengers hear the word turbulence.

  • They start to quietly or not so quietly panic.

  • That's why crew members avoid saying this word when they're talking to each other.

  • Instead, they use the term air pocket.

  • But it's just another word for the phenomenon that will jostle your playing up and down or from one side to the other May.

  • I'd rather have a hot pocket number eight runners.

  • If your first flight has arrived late and you're in a mad dash to catch her connecting flight, you're a runner.

  • You might over hear crew members or ground staff say runners air on the way.

  • It means you're waiting for some transfer passengers.

  • Unfortunately, if a flight has a strict departure time, it may leave without the runners happened to May had to wave bye bye to my own flight.

  • Has your play never taken off without you?

  • Let me know your most memorable good or bad airport experience down in the comments, and let's keep going.

  • Number nine Zulu time.

  • During one fly, the plane can pass several time zones to avoid confusion in communication with air traffic controllers, pilots use Zulu time.

  • It's also called Greenwich Mean Time or GMT, and it's the universal time zone for air travel.

  • GMT is the time of Greenwich London and if it's 5 p.m. In Greenwich, it'll be 5 p.m. for every plane in the sky.

  • 10 gate lies, no scalp of aiding bugs.

  • Here.

  • Gate lice is what ground staff and flight crew call passengers who start to crowd in front of their gate long before the boarding is announced.

  • All their focus is on board in the plane as fast as possible and securing a place for their carry on luggage in an overhead bin Over there.

  • See?

  • So try not to be one of these.

  • 11th pan pan pilots use this term in their communication with air traffic controllers.

  • This is the signal that means something has gone wrong with the flight, and the cockpit crew needs immediate attention.

  • When other pilots are using the same radio frequency.

  • Hear this signal?

  • They stop all their communication and let the pan pan pilot get their message through 12 Tree Flower five Niner.

  • Now a short lesson on pilot English tree stands for three.

  • Faour is 45 is five and nine er means nine.

  • No, your captain doesn't have marshmallows in his mouth.

  • Such pronunciation helps to avoid radio miscommunications and the confusion caused by similar sounding numbers and words.

  • 13.

  • Red Eye to do its name A red eye is an overnight flight, and while some flight attendants have difficulty keeping their eyes open, others love night shifts because almost the whole plane is sleeping.

  • 14 Pinkeye, Not an eye infection in the aviation world.

  • But a flight that takes place a bit earlier than the red eye is still arrives pretty late in the evening, but usually no later than midnight.

  • 15 packs.

  • When you hear a flight attendant saying we have 130 packs on board, they mean passengers.

  • And if they want to refer to a certain passenger, flight attendants are likely to use their seat number.

  • For example, 22 Charlie or 18 Alfa 16 Fairy flying.

  • This term is used when an empty plane with no passengers or cargo onboard gets flown from one place to another.

  • For cabin crew, it's a time when they can relax.

  • Fairy flights may happen when there's a technical problem with an airliner and pilots need to bring it back to its home base.

  • 17.

  • Do the flight deck.

  • Need anything?

  • If you hear a flight attendant asking a colleague this question, they want to know if the cockpit crew, which is the captain and first officer, have any requests?

  • A.

  • Maybe some popcorn.

  • 18.

  • Roger and Wilco in aviation slang.

  • Roger stands for message received, but it doesn't mean that the speaker will comply with this message.

  • Will Co, on the other hand, is a short form of will comply.

  • In other words, the speaker has received, understood and will follow the instructions.

  • 19 chimes.

  • No, they're not the little green onions you put on baked potatoes.

  • Chimes are the very dings you hair.

  • Throughout the fly.

  • They could mean loads of different things from an emergency to the pilots call or, more commonly, a passenger pressing the service button.

  • Flight attendants can distinguish the chimes because all the dings have different tones.

  • 20 flight level.

  • That's just a cool way to say how many 1000 feet there are under your plane.

  • Just add two zeros and you'll figure out the exact number.

  • For example, by saying that you're cruising.

  • Altitude is flight level 350 Your pilot means that the aircraft is 35,000 feet above sea.

  • Level 21.

  • We're just finishing some paperwork.

  • If you hear the captain saying this phrase, it doesn't automatically mean you're in for a delay.

  • Finishing paperwork usually means revising the flight itinerary, checking the plane's weight and balance, or even waiting for the ground staff to prepare the flights logbook.

  • But I've also heard it used wants to disguise the fact that maintenance crew is trying to fix something on the plane.

  • 22 Final approach.

  • The final approach means slightly different things for pilots and flight attendants.

  • Cabin crew speaks of the final approach when the plane is nearing the final part of the descent.

  • For pilots, the final approach means the plane is already aligned with the runway and they don't need a maneuver or make additional turns.

  • I think a long time ago they used to say something like, We're now making our terminal descent to the airport.

  • But lately the word terminal just has this unfortunate, you know, end of life connotation.

  • So I like final approach.

  • Ah, lot better.

  • 23 direct versus non stop flight.

  • Plenty of travelers mixed these terms up.

  • A direct flight can have stops along the way.

  • The main thing is that it's number doesn't get changed.

  • Other than that, a plane can have as many intermediate stops as needed.

  • A non stop flight, on the other hand, doesn't land until it arrives at its final.

  • Destination 24.

  • It's the final and immediate boarding call.

  • If this phrase include your name, who you're in trouble.

  • The airline staff announces this to inform you that the plane is about to leave.

  • It sounds urgent and serious, and it is.

  • So get your butt on board.

  • 25 S.

  • O.

  • P.

  • The abbreviation S O.

  • P.

  • Stands for standard operating procedures.

  • That's all the task the cabin crew performs on board.

  • And there are many keeping Passengersbags away from exits, opening window shades before takeoff and landing, putting coasters under glasses in business class.

  • That's not even the tip of the iceberg.

  • 26 bulkhead.

  • No, it's not the jerky passenger three rows up that would be a Jughead.

  • Bulkhead is either a wall or a curtain that separates different cabin classes or the galley in the laboratory.

  • If you have a bulkhead seat, count yourself lucky you'll have more leg room, 27 area of weather This phrase usually means heavy rain or a thunderstorm not far from a flying plane.

  • So don't be surprised if your captain says there's an area of weather ahead.

  • We're going to fly around it and then I check and make sure my barf bag Sorry.

  • I mean, my turbulence effects collection receptacle is Andy.

  • Hey, if you learn something new today that give the video alike and share with a friend and here are some other videos I think you'll enjoy, just click to the left or right and remember, stay on the bright side of life.

So you accidentally cats, um, bits of conversation between flight attendants and pilots, and it's like they're speaking another language.

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27個飛行員的短語乘客一無所知 (27 Pilots' Phrases Passengers Know Nothing About)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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