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  • Hi.

  • Welcome to another Isles video.

  • In this video, we're going to look at how to understand your academic task.

  • One question.

  • If you find this video helpful, visit my blawg at Isles.

  • I'll start calm and visit the forum isles network dot com in academic task one.

  • You will be required to describe at least one visual data source in writing.

  • As you know, your data source could be one of four types.

  • A graph, a table, a chart or a diagram.

  • Of course, understanding the data European shown is critically important to your ability to produce an accurate response.

  • So today I'd like to look at the four different out of sources and talk about key features you should make note of when interpreting the data and preparing yourself mentally to produce a logical representation of the data in English.

  • Ready.

  • So, as you've likely noticed, half the screen is black, and it is in this area that I would like to outline roughly the sort of structure you should be mentally producing.

  • Um, you know, if reach data source before you actually put your pen to paper and start writing.

  • So as with all I'll spreading tasks there is no single correct structure to use and us we need to be, you know, flexible and creative and dynamic.

  • And we need to tailor our response to the data sources that were presented with so to start today's lesson.

  • Um, so here we see a straightforward graph.

  • Now, if you see a graphing, you're ill.

  • So will likely either be a paragraph for a line graph.

  • But in any case, graphs describe relationships between two or more pieces of data, and they do this through.

  • And X and y axis grafts can also be made to share additional information to, as his exemplified in this graph through the framing of this data over the course of three years.

  • 2003 dozen for 2005 uh, which are color coordinated with the various bars in this graph.

  • So the trick with these sorts of graphs is identifying common trends and grouping them in a manner that is both logical and stylistically sound.

  • So, as you've learned before, academic task one involves identifying the broad minor and my new trends.

  • Um, And in doing this, um, we are put in a position where we're better able Thio make logical organization in our written response.

  • So if we look at this graph, the broad trend would be if we look across all age groups, the broad trend would be a mild increase, okay, and then somewhat of a plateau, and then a significant decrease in smoking rates as Scottish women age.

  • Now, in our response, um, we want to reflect this broad detail, Um, in the opening or introduction section of already now, following this, we would want to share the minor trends.

  • Okay.

  • And I won't go through.

  • All of you know, the minor trends, because there are several.

  • But you would want to notice certain things that can be grouped together and then group those things together in your written response.

  • So, uh and then with, you know, within those minor trends, we punctuate them with with my new details.

  • So, for example, if we look at this graph now, between 16 years of age Scottish from their 16 years of age between 16 and 59 we see a common value.

  • Verily common.

  • This looks like it might be a little bit lower, but relatively common value for this large age group.

  • And that is in the year 2003.

  • So an idea might be to write a paragraph that that describes the information we see in these four age groups.

  • Okay, because we can group the 2003 figure into a single sentence, right?

  • And then we can describe the 2004 and then ah, 2005 actually is also very logical.

  • It's almost the same between 16 and 44 years of age.

  • So it's it's It makes logical sense to perhaps group these four age groups into one paragraph and describe them that way.

  • We would likely group these two figures.

  • We could group these two in their own separate paragraph because they are different.

  • And we might talk about the facts that as women age in Scotland, you know, it doesn't matter what year 3 4000 40,005 as women Agent Scotland, Thebes.

  • Prevalence of smoking declines.

  • So and you know that's not the only option we would have available to us.

  • We could describe the data in three paragraphs.

  • One paragraph, um, you know, designated to two a year so we could have a paragraph for two dozen three.

  • Another paragraph 2004 and 1/3 1 for 2000 bucks.

  • So, you know, we have several options available to us, and I guess we'd have to go with whatever we would feel most confident doing.

  • And for me, that would be grouping these four age groups and talking about the data that way.

  • Okay, pie charts show fractions of a hole and require you to be confident when speaking about percentages.

  • So reviewing the language needed to do this is important.

  • And I advise you to two, If you're gonna read the academic, ensure that you're comfortable writing and comparing percentages, it is unlikely that you will get a single pie chart Pie charts are normally coupled with another data source whether that data source is another pipe short as we see here, or perhaps a bar graph or a table or even a diagram.

  • So it is important that you recognize the need to establish the relationship that exists between the pie chart and whatever second data source you're given.

  • Now, in our instance, here we're comparing quantities of you export goods to Brazil and to Russia.

  • Okay.

  • As so it reads, the following charts depict you exports to both Brazil, Russia write a report for university lecturer summarizing information presented.

  • So, after giving our opening statement outlining the type of data sources we have been presented with, um, we would likely taken entire paragraph to analyze the details that we see within this first pie chart, which is you goods exported to Brazil.

  • And while describing we might couple, um, certain items that have the same values.

  • So, for example, of the UK and Belgium, which you're both at 7% now that we would then proceed to a second paragraph second analyzing paragraph that uses quite a bit of comparative language to reveal details for the second pint shirt and how these details, um, you know how you experts to Russia compare to you exports to Brazil.

  • So it would really be in the second, uh, you know, analyzing paragraph where you would see the heavy comparative language come out again.

  • We might, you know, couple certain figures that are the same.

  • So the UK in Belgium are once again the same Sweden.

  • It's the same as Austria.

  • So So when we have these thes identical figures, we can get away with with coupling them into a single sentence, and and then we can be much more concise with our language, which helps speed up how quickly we can create this response.

  • And it also it's considered good style to be as succinct as possible.

  • I should also point out that sometimes if you're if you're given to pie charts, you will be given the same information at two different points in time.

  • That's not the case here, but, um, And then in that instance, you would have to describe what trends what trends can be understood from the graft tables or another possible task.

  • Win data source tables often present data that either evils like what we see here that that changes over time or is cyclical, like, for example, of a bus schedule or a table depicting annual rainfall patterns.

  • So the language you will need to use neither case differs slightly, and I suggest you you practice you know as much as you can both kinds of language so that you're comfortable with it, and you'd be comfortable you be comfortable using it in your exam.

  • So in this example, here we see data that he vaults among four countries within the UK over the course of eight years because this particular data source is time sensitive.

  • Ah, lot of the language and strategies we will use here will be similar to those for most grass because, as you know, I mean, not all grasses and not even the graph that we were looking at in this lesson.

  • But many grafts do.

  • I have time across their X axis and, uh, and they show, you know, the manner in which something evolves or develops over the course of months or years, or whatever the case may be.

  • So the language is often similar.

  • So we would start this response with a sentence outlining what the data source is and what it is showing.

  • And you know, any broad trends that that might be worth noting.

  • As the data among the four countries is fairly similar, we could group all data into one large comparison paragraph if we wanted to.

  • Lots of comparative language would be needed to illustrate how the country's compared to one another.

  • Um, I mean, of course, if, say, two of these countries were very similar and the other two countries were different but similar to each other, then you might consider grouping, say England and Wales into, you know, one paragraph and that analyzes the manner in which these two countries, you know, move in relation to each other.

  • If they were similar, I mean and then Scotland and Northern Ireland the same.

  • I mean, if they were very similar, but different from England.

  • Wales, we met grew into a separate paragraph.

  • But in this particular instance, all four countries seem to follow fairly similar progression.

  • So, you know, we see there is some variation, but for the most part there's, you know, growth.

  • I mean, none of the country's finish 2011 lower than than their value in 2004 for example.

  • But I mean, there is some variation it did you have to describe.

  • But on the whole, the countries are somewhat moving in in similar direction.

  • We could group certain parts of the data together.

  • So, for example, England's 2004 and 2005 figures and 2006 and two dozen seven figures, you see Ah, it plateaus and then it, you know, grows and plateaus again.

  • So we could, you know, do what?

  • We can t group these together so that we're not having to share, you know?

  • Okay, 2004 the Valley was 4.7.

  • Doesn't five was 4.7?

  • We can condense everything and make it as concise as possible.

  • And the piece could finish with a reiteration that all four countries show similar figures over the period in question, Which would be a nice way.

  • Thio finish off the task.

  • One response.

  • No.

  • Right.

  • Diagrams can be tricky because they are somewhat unpredictable.

  • Typically, your test one diagram will show some kind of process that is either cyclical.

  • So, for example, the life cycle of an animal.

  • That would be a cyclical diagram, um, or has a clear beginning, middle and end so similar to the diagram that we see here?

  • And it's also possible to receive something that's specially sensitive, like a like a map or, ah, a diagram for a piece of machinery or something like that.

  • It was impossible as well for this process diagram.

  • We would clearly state what the source is and what it shows in some sort of background statement or opening opening statement opening paragraph.

  • You would then describe the process from start to finish, so this start is here with this sum this, uh, digger pulling a play and you'd separate the data into paragraphs as needed.

  • I would likely group the information into two paragraphs.

  • So perhaps separating the data somewhere around the halfway point where the raw materials start resembling the finished product.

  • But, you know, you could group it as you see fit.

  • You really do need to be dynamic.

  • And I encourage you to do lots of practicing before you get into your examination and to receive feedback to ensure that that time your grouping data in a a logical and fluent way.

  • So as I mentioned, it's possible to see a map on your files, and a candidate recently reported seeing these two maps, and they've recreated them and posted them to the forum.

  • So I thought I would use thes and just talk a little bit about you know how to mentally prepare yourself in the event you receive something like this so that we can see the maps show an area in 1950 and that same area as it looks today.

  • Now eso sharing this as our opening statement and perhaps commenting that there appears to be some major changes between the two maps.

  • That would be a great introduction paragraph for our response.

  • After this introduction, I would take a paragraph to describe the first map in 1950 and I was just in great detail.

  • And then the second paragraph would be where I'd use heavy comparative language.

  • So I mean, as you can see, it's sort of similar to that question we're looking at with the two pie charts where we're going to describe one of the pipe starts in detail.

  • And then we're going to save our comparative language for the second paragraph.

  • What we start describing the second picture.

  • It's similar that so you know, here we would describe how you know there was a residential area.

  • Looks to be like There are two, you know, places where shipping containers can be off loaded or loaded, Um, and then talk about this.

  • I think it's his tram, so there's a tram line that runs through the business district of the area, clustered in the map.

  • And then when we go to the second paragraph talking about the map as it looks today, we would mention how a lot of of these things have disappeared.

  • The business district has grown larger, the tram has grown smaller and there is a footbridge and some sort of stadium, and there is no more residential area.

  • And of course, you know, we'd be every pretty much every sentence.

  • We would be using some sort of comparative transition to show how this compares to the map from 1950.

  • So I hope that video outlines a few logical approaches regarding how to interpret data and and mentally prepare yourself for the written response.

  • In subsequent videos, we will go into more detail regarding how to recognize these broad minor menu details and communicate these in written English.

  • Good luck with your studies and thank you for listening.

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如何理解你的學術任務1問題 (How to understand your Academic Task 1 question)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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